Wednesday, November 30, 2016

[californiadisasters] On This Date In California Weather History (December 1)



2011: Strong offshore winds hit the region.
In San Bernardino gusts hit 70 mph with sustained winds of 49 mph.
A few trucks were overturned on I-15 and I-210.
Power lines were downed near San Bernardino.

2011: A Mono Wind event took place along the crest of the Sierra Nevada, adjacent foothills, and parts of the San Joaquin Valley, including the north side of Fresno.
Damage in the Fresno area was estimated at $2 million due to down power lines, trees, and property damage.
Strong northeast winds felled numerous trees in Fresno and in Yosemite National Park, and power outages affected at least several thousand customers due to down power poles.
Daytime high temperatures in locations where strong winds occurred rose about 15 to 20 degrees from the previous day as these winds were dry and allowed the air to heat as it traveled down the slopes of the Sierra and foothills.

2007:
Heavy rain from cutoff low with a tropical connection produced up to 6" of rain at Palomar Mountain and Forest Falls on 11.30 and on this day.
A debris flow (including large trees) over the Poomacha Burn area buried a house in mud, and caused serious damage to several vehicles and highway 76.
The flow was estimated at 15 feet high and 150 to 200 feet wide.

1986: Extremely high tides on this day and on 12.2 arrived at area beaches.
High tides were 7.7 feet at San Diego.
Minor flooding occurred at La Jolla Shores' parking lot and there were a few beach closures.
On 12.1 minor flooding (4" of sea water) occurred along Pacific Coast Highway in Huntington Beach from rising tides and prompted lane closures.

1982: A big storm that started on 11.30 and ended on this day brought widespread record rains and strong winds that knocked out power to 1.6 million homes.

1973: Palo Alto received 1.88" of rain.

1973: 22" of snow fell at Glenbrook, NV (east shore Lake Tahoe).

1973: A funnel cloud was sighted north of the Fresno Air Terminal.

1919: 16" of snow fell at Portola.

Source: NWS San Francisco/Monterey, Hanford, Reno, & San Diego

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Posted by: Kim Noyes <kimnoyes@gmail.com>


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[californiadisasters] On This Date In California Weather History (November 30)



2007: Heavy rain from cutoff low with a tropical connection produced up to 6" of rain at Palomar Mountain and Forest Falls on this day and on 12.1.
A debris flow (including large trees) over the Poomacha Burn area buried a house in mud, and caused serious damage to several vehicles and highway 76.
The flow was estimated at 15 feet high and 150 to 200 feet wide.

2004: Vallejo had a low temperature of 30° F.

1997: A waterspout was reported 6 miles south of Newport Beach.

1982: 26" of snow fell at Tahoe City, with 22" of snow reported at Truckee.

1982: A big storm that started on this day and ended on 12.1 brought widespread record rains and strong winds that knocked out power to 1.6 million homes.
1.96" of rain fell in LA on this day, a daily record.
On this day the LAX airport recorded a wind gust of 60 mph.

1972: Fresno had a high temperature of only 44° F, lowest on record for the month of November.

1970: A series of storms struck the region from 11.25 to this day following large destructive wildfires in the San Bernardino and San Gabriel Mountains earlier in the fall.
9.17" of precipitation fell in Lake Arrowhead, 7.22" in Lytle Creek, 5.11" in Big Bear Lake, 5.02" in Palomar Mountain, 3.56" in San Bernardino, 2.63" in Redlands, 2.51" in Santa Ana, and 2.05" in San Diego.
Flooding inundated streets and highways in the Rancho Cucamonga area.
At least 60 homes were damaged by floods and debris flows.
On this day a waterspout and three small funnel clouds were reported six miles west of San Diego.

1952: Heavy rain dropped almost 1" in Upland.
Street flooding was reported in Upland and homes were flooded in Ontario.

1932: Fresno received 0.3" of rain.
This is the latest occurrence of the first measurable rain of the water season on record.

1922: The morning low temperature at Reno, NV, was 8° F.

Source: NWS San Francisco/Monterey, Hanford, Reno, & San Diego

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Posted by: Kim Noyes <kimnoyes@gmail.com>


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[californiadisasters] Chimney Top 2 Wildfire Situation Report [1 Attachment]

[Attachment(s) from Steve Detwiler included below]

Good Evening,

The Emergency Manager's Weekly Report, Chimney Top Fire 2 Situation Report is now available at: http://arcg.is/2fT5Hii

Steve Detwiler
Editor
Emergency Manager's Weekly Report




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Attachment(s) from Steve Detwiler | View attachments on the web

1 of 1 File(s)


Posted by: Steve Detwiler <steveorange2011@gmail.com>


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Re: [californiadisasters] TURBO 77 & 78



Air Force refueling aircraft. MOA is military operations area. 

Sent from my iPhone

On Nov 30, 2016, at 13:12, FyerChief@aol.com [californiadisasters] <californiadisasters@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

 

What is all this?
 
Robert
 
In a message dated 11/30/2016 1:04:55 P.M. Pacific Standard Time, californiadisasters@yahoogroups.com writes:
 

English please lol


On Nov 30, 2016 10:28 AM, "Bill Halpin bhalpin@cableone.net [californiadisasters]" <californiadisasters@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
 

1722z TURBO 77 & TURBO 78 (22ARW KC-135R KIAB) heading 317.8 blocks FL15.0 to 16.0 in the Southern California region possible TURTLE MOA. A2A on 225.500


Bill Halpin
Prescott Valley, AZ

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Posted by: Carlos L-M <laremasters@hotmail.com>


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Re: [californiadisasters] TURBO 77 & 78



What is all this?
 
Robert
 
In a message dated 11/30/2016 1:04:55 P.M. Pacific Standard Time, californiadisasters@yahoogroups.com writes:
 

English please lol


On Nov 30, 2016 10:28 AM, "Bill Halpin bhalpin@cableone.net [californiadisasters]" <californiadisasters@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
 

1722z TURBO 77 & TURBO 78 (22ARW KC-135R KIAB) heading 317.8 blocks FL15.0 to 16.0 in the Southern California region possible TURTLE MOA. A2A on 225.500


Bill Halpin
Prescott Valley, AZ

--




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Posted by: FyerChief@aol.com


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Re: [californiadisasters] TURBO 77 & 78



English please lol


On Nov 30, 2016 10:28 AM, "Bill Halpin bhalpin@cableone.net [californiadisasters]" <californiadisasters@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
 

1722z TURBO 77 & TURBO 78 (22ARW KC-135R KIAB) heading 317.8 blocks FL15.0 to 16.0 in the Southern California region possible TURTLE MOA. A2A on 225.500


Bill Halpin
Prescott Valley, AZ

--




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Posted by: tom bilman <t_billman@hotmail.com>


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Re: [californiadisasters] TURBO 77 & 78



Bill,

Please translate this into regular English!

Kim

On Wed, Nov 30, 2016 at 9:28 AM, Bill Halpin bhalpin@cableone.net [californiadisasters] <californiadisasters@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
 

1722z TURBO 77 & TURBO 78 (22ARW KC-135R KIAB) heading 317.8 blocks FL15.0 to 16.0 in the Southern California region possible TURTLE MOA. A2A on 225.500


Bill Halpin
Prescott Valley, AZ

--




--


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Posted by: Kim Noyes <kimnoyes@gmail.com>


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[Volcano_Vista_HS] VVHS Announcements--Wednesday, November 30, 2016



Students your mothers, fathers and caregivers do not attend Volcano Vista. Therefore you need to take the responsibility and clean up after yourselves. Pick up your trash and throw it away especially at lunch.

 

PB & J: Student senate is sponsoring the PB & J Wish project. We still have 25 children that need to be adopted. If your club, team or class would like to adopt a child or family for the holidays and provide them with their wish list, stop by the Activities Office and pick up a name. All gifts need to be returned by Wednesday, December 7.

 

CLUB FAIR:  during lunch on Wednesday there will be a Club Fair in the hallway by E and F halls. Stop by to see what activities we offer on campus.

 

DECA: Attention Freshmen, did you know you can join DECA by taking a business class next year? DECA is continually involved in our community and would like to meet you. Please visit our booth at the club fair today during lunch for more information.

 

UNIFIED HAWKS, we have a club meeting this Thursday during lunch in room H217.  See you there! 

 

CLASS OF 2017 we have a club meeting this Thursday during lunch in room A101.  We will be discussing plans for Winterball. See you there!

 

JAZZ BAND: Our Jazz Band will be playing on Friday during lunch down in the H-hall concourse. Come watch our amazing students perform.

 

CRAFT FAIR: Volcano Vista will have their 3rd Annual Craft Fair on Saturday, December 10 from 9:00 am - 3:00 pm in the A-Hall concourse area.

 

LIBRARY: Students! Please note that starting in December (yes, tomorrow) only student ID's will be accepted to use the computers. If you have lost your ID, please go to activities to purchase a new one.

 

COUNSELING:

  • SENIORS remember to fill out college applications and your FAFSA during break. Deadlines for many UNM scholarships are December 1st.

  • Seniors: New Mexico Highlands University will be on campus today at lunch in lower E-hall. Come by to ask about admissions and financial aid.

 


ATHLETICS:

  • WRESTLING: we have our first dual meet Wednesday against Los Lunas at 5:30pm in the Ring of Fire. We hope we can have all parents and supporters in attendance. We will be beginning wrestling at 5:30 starting with our JV squad, followed by the presentation of our senior athletes. We hope to start the Varsity dual by 7PM. Please join us as we kick off our season and honor the class of 2017.  The team also has a match on Saturday at Cibola beginning at 9AM.

  • GIRLS BASKETBALL: will play Onate Friday at 5:30 and Las Cruces Saturday at 1PM

  • BOYS BASKETBALL: will play Onate Friday at 7. This is our first boys home game. Let's Black Out the gym.  They also play Las Cruces Saturday at 2:30

  • SWIM: has a meet at West Mesa Pool Saturday at 8am. 

And remember

As always

It's Great to be a Hawk



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Posted by: ssteckbeck@yahoo.com


For more information, go to our web site: http://www.volcanovistahawks.com




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[californiadisasters] TURBO 77 & 78



1722z TURBO 77 & TURBO 78 (22ARW KC-135R KIAB) heading 317.8 blocks FL15.0 to 16.0 in the Southern California region possible TURTLE MOA. A2A on 225.500


Bill Halpin
Prescott Valley, AZ

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Posted by: Bill Halpin <bhalpin@cableone.net>


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Tuesday, November 29, 2016

[Geology2] What's up with Madagascar?



What's up with Madagascar?

Why are there volcanoes on an island that isn't near any tectonic boundaries?

Date:
November 28, 2016
Source:
Washington University in St. Louis
Summary:
The island of Madagascar off the coast of Africa was largely unexplored seismically until recently. The first broadband seismic images of the island help solve a longstanding mystery: why are there volcanoes far from any tectonic boundary?

Curious onlookers surround Ghassan Aleqabi (gray suit coat), seismic installation specialist at Washington University in St. Louis, and Madagascaran graduate student Fenitra Andriampenomanana (white shirt to Ghassan's left) as they install a seismic station at Mandritsara in Northern Madagascar.
Credit: Martin Pratt

Madagascar, the big island off the east coast of Africa with the lemurs and baobabs, is thought to be sitting in the middle of an old tectonic plate, and so, by the rules of plate tectonics, should be tectonically quiet: few earthquakes and no volcanoes.

But it's not. The island has been away from tectonic action for the past 80 million years, said Martin Pratt, research scientist in earth and planetary sciences at Washington University in St. Louis, yet it experiences about 500 earthquakes per year.

The island also has volcanoes that have been active within the recent geologic past. "Having active volcanoes in Madagascar is like having erupting volcanoes in St. Louis," said Michael Wysession, professor of earth and planetary sciences. "You have to ask yourself, 'What are they doing there?'"

Since this part of the world is geologically complex, there are lots of interesting possible explanations for the volcanoes. To figure it out, the geologists needed to be able to examine not just the island's accessible surface, but also what lies beneath the rigid crust and upper mantle.

To image Earth's interior, geologists use a technique called seismic tomography that is similar to the medical CT scan, probing Earth's strictire with seismic waves from distant earthquakes and ambient noise. But remote and politically unstable Madagascar was largely unexplored by seismic methods until recently.

Starting in 2010, however, three groups, including one led by Washington University seismologists Wysession and Doug Wiens, began to deploy seismic arrays on Madagascar, on nearby islands in the Mozambique channel (between the island and Africa), and on the ocean floor east of Madagascar.

In an article published online Nov. 22 in Earth and Planetary Science Letters, the Washington University scientists report that they found three areas of hot rock within the mantle beneath three separate volcanic provinces on the island.

They also see signs that the bottom of the lithosphere beneath the central volcanic province has peeled off. As the cold rock sank into the mantle, hotter rock flowed around it to the center and the south of the island. The crust, unburdened, bobbed higher. The northern volcanic province, meanwhile, probably taps a different heat source.

A busted-up chunk of an ancient continent

Madagascar, originally part of the ancient continent Gondwana, was formed in two steps. The island, together with India, pulled away from Africa 150 million years ago, stretching and thinning the crust on the island's west coast before it finally snapped off. The thinned crust on the west coast sagged and the dips filled with sediments, forming deep basins of sedimentary rocks.

Then, about 90 million years ago, when the mini-continent migrated over the Marion hotspot (a mantle plume that now lies beneath the Antarctic plate to the south), brief but voluminous eruptions covered the island in lava. The blast of heat is thought to have cracked the overriding continent into two parts, Madagascar and India, which scraped past the east coast of Madagascar on its way north toward Asia, leaving a very straight coastline there.

But the volcanism in the central, northern, and southern provinces are much younger than the basaltic remains of the 90-million-year-old eruption still found around the perimeter of Madagascar. So the question was: Where did they come from?

What the images show

Lead-author Pratt used three complementary methods to analyze surface waves (seismic waves trapped near Earth's surface), which are created by distant earthquakes and from sources of seismic noise, such as ocean storms.

"His approach is clever and creative," Wysession said. "He's taken three really different data sets, some good at high frequencies that give you better resolution at shallow depths, and some better at low frequencies that give you better resolution at greater depths, and he's put them all together. It's a bit like combining an X-ray, an MRI and a CT scan to get a clearer image."

The images show three low-velocity seismic anomalies corresponding to the upwelling of hotter mantle rock along the island's backbone.

"We knew about the named volcanic provinces in the center and north," Wysession said. "But we didn't know about the one in the southwest. When we saw the third blob in the images, we checked the literature and discovered that, sure enough, there was volcanic activity there as recently as 9 million years ago."

The cause of the three hot regions in the mantle is a mystery, however. Though there is some indication from the tomographic images that the regions might be connected, particularly the southern two, further modeling of deeper structure will be needed to confirm.

One origin of the hot regions previously has been proposed to be hot rock rising through the mantle as the Comores hot spot, which has created a set of volcanic islands just west of the north end of the island.

The authors have a different idea, however, and it comes from the way that the central and southwestern provinces appear to be connected at depth.

"If you look at the images that Martin has made," Wysession said, "you can see a horseshoe shape where the central hot mantle anomaly swings west and then comes back east again, connecting the central and southern provinces.

The deflecting obstacle seems to be a slab of colder rock. "We think the lithosphere (the crust and rigid upper mantle) has delaminated, and the bottom of it fell off," Wysession said. "As the cold, dense slab began to sink, hotter rock flowed up and in to replace it, buoying the central province and, as it tilted, blocking flow to the south."

But what caused the bottom of the lithosphere to peel off? "We think it may have been the Marion hotspot," Wysession said. "The underside of the plate was heated by this huge blow torch 95 million years ago, weakening the rock enough that it was able to peel off. So we're still seeing collateral damage from this ancient event."

This idea also has the advantage of explaining the unusually high elevations of the northern half of the island. Once the heavy bottom of the plate fell off, it stopped pulling down the crust, which rebounded upward as much as a kilometer as hot rock from below took the place of the delaminated slab.

Something similar happened underneath the Great Basin of the western United States, he said, where the bottom of the lithosphere also split off, forming a large blob of cold material sinking down through the mantle below the surface of central Nevada. There, the blow torch that delaminated the plate was an ocean spreading center that was overridden by the North American plate, Wysession said.


Story Source:

Materials provided by Washington University in St. Louis. Original written by Diana Lutz. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Martin J. Pratt, Michael E. Wysession, Ghassan Aleqabi, Douglas A. Wiens, Andrew A. Nyblade, Patrick Shore, GĂ©rard Rambolamanana, Fenitra Andriampenomanana, Tsiriandrimanana Rakotondraibe, Robert D. Tucker, Guilhem Barruol, Elisa Rindraharisaona. Shear velocity structure of the crust and upper mantle of Madagascar derived from surface wave tomography. Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 2016; DOI: 10.1016/j.epsl.2016.10.041


Washington University in St. Louis. "What's up with Madagascar? Why are there volcanoes on an island that isn't near any tectonic boundaries?." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 28 November 2016. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/11/161128151243.htm>.

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Posted by: Lin Kerns <linkerns@gmail.com>



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[Geology2] Earthquake: Pictures show huge walls of land rose after quake in Waiau




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Posted by: Lin Kerns <linkerns@gmail.com>



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[californiadisasters] New Event, Tuesday, 29 November 2016



"New Event" reminder
When
Tuesday, 29 November 2016
11:00 AM to 11:30 AM
(GMT) Greenwich Mean Time - Dublin / Edinburgh / Lisbon / London
Where
1991 Coalinga Deadly Duststorm
Notes
A dust storm, dropping visibility to less than 50 feet, occurred near Coalinga caused a series of chain-reaction accidents, many of them fiery, on Interstate 5, involving a total of 104 vehicles and resulting in 17 fatalities and numerous serious injuries including critical burn injuries.
From
californiadisasters   Calendar


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Monday, November 28, 2016

[californiadisasters] On This Date In California Weather History (November 29)



2006: Offshore winds gusted to 73 mph at Fremont Canyon (sustained 54 mph) and 58 mph at Ontario. 
Widespread property damage and power outages resulted from downed power lines, poles, and trees.

2004: Donner Memorial State Park (near Truckee)  had a morning low of -3° F, while Reno reported a low of 4° F.

1991: A dust storm, dropping visibility to less than 50 feet, occurred near Coalinga caused a series of chain-reaction accidents on Interstate 5, involving a total of 104 vehicles and resulting in 17 fatalities.

1985: Bakersfield clocked a wind gust of 49 mph from the northwest, highest on record for the month of November.

1976: It was 32° F in Borrego Springs, the earliest date in the season to record a freezing temperature.

1975: A M7.2 earthquake hit Hawaii on this day, sending a tsunami that hit Santa Catalina Island. 
In San Diego a 2.4-foot maximum amplitude was measured. 
Some damage resulted.

1975: Fresno dipped to 26° F for a low temperature, coldest on record here in November.

1975: The first winter storm of season was a heavy one. 
It started on 11.28 and ended on this day. Up to two feet of snow fell in the San Bernardino Mountains, including 16" at Big Bear Lake. 
Twenty stranded campers were rescued after a few days. 
It was 17° F at Palomar Mountain, the lowest temperature on record for November
This also occurred on 11.16.1964 and 11.16.1958. 

1970: A series of storms struck the region from 11.25 to 11.30 following large destructive wildfires in the San Bernardino and San Gabriel Mountains earlier in the fall. 
9.17" of precipitation fell in Lake Arrowhead, 7.22" in Lytle Creek, 5.11" in Big Bear Lake, 5.02" in Palomar Mountain, 3.56" in San Bernardino, 2.63" in Redlands, 2.51" in Santa Ana, and 2.05" in San Diego. 
Flooding inundated streets and highways in the Rancho Cucamonga area. 
At least 60 homes were damaged by floods and debris flows.

1970: Palo Alto received 2.48" of rain -- a record for the month. 

1963: Five minutes of sunshine were observed on this date in Fresno; only sunlight seen in an 11 day streak from November 27 through December 7th. 
Clouds kept high temperatures in the 40's each day.

1892: Virginia City, NV reported an incredible 5.46" of precipitation, its largest one-day total ever.

Source: NWS San Francisco/Monterey, Hanford, Reno, & San Diego

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Posted by: Kim Noyes <kimnoyes@gmail.com>


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