Wednesday, March 29, 2017

[californiadisasters] Lack of markings caused 2016 fatal bus crash, report finds



Lack of markings caused 2016 fatal bus crash, report finds

Inadequate highway markings caused a fatal Greyhound bus crash in California last year that killed two people and injured 13 others, including the driver, federal officials said Tuesday.

The National Transportation Safety Board report said that the lack of reflective warning markers on U.S. Highway 101 made the bus driver think he was in the connector lane when he was actually heading straight into a concrete barrier on that dark, rainy morning.

The California Department of Transportation, or Caltrans, did not properly mark the area separating the two lanes, the board said.

Caltrans didn't immediately return a call seeking comment.

"This crash did not have to happen because the barrier that the bus hit should have been visible, even in the bad weather, but it was not," said NTSB Acting Chairman Bella Dinh-Zarr.

The bus was on an overnight trip from Los Angeles to San Jose when it plowed into safety barrels and flipped on its side on the rain-soaked highway early on Jan. 19, 2016.

Passengers described hearing a bang and a loud scraping sound for about 10 seconds as the bus see-sawed along the asphalt.

The driver, who was one of those sent to the hospital, stopped for a caffeine jolt at the last stop before the wreck, about 30 miles south in Gilroy, the California Highway Patrol said at the time of the accident. But federal officials didn't mention fatigue as a factor.

Dinh-Zarr said that even though the bus had seat belts only two of the 21 passengers were wearing them and that contributed to the severity of the injuries.

"The crash would probably have resulted in fewer deaths and injuries if the occupants had worn their seat belts," she said.

The NTSB recommended that Caltrans add road markers and improve exit signage. It also said Greyhound should brief its passengers on the importance of wearing seat belts.

Source: http://www.scpr.org/news/2017/03/29/70281/lack-of-markings-caused-2016-fatal-bus-crash-repor/

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Posted by: Kim Noyes <kimnoyes@gmail.com>


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[californiadisasters] On This Date In California Weather History (March 29)



2006: Late-season winter storm brought hefty snow totals in a 24-48 hour period to the southern Sierra Nevada and Kern County mountains. 
Lodgepole received 34", 52" fell at Big Meadows and 55" at Kaiser Point. Piute recorded 15".

2004: High temperature in Bakersfield reached 94° F. 
This marked the 17th time this March the high temperatures reached or eclipsed 80°, setting a new record.

1998: The coldest storm during this El Niño year started on 3.28 and ended on this day. 
One to three feet of snow fell above 5000 feet, 4"-8" of snow fell above 3000 feet. 
Ice pellets and hail accumulated to 1" deep in some coastal and foothill areas. 
Considerable damage to crops was incurred. 
Serious traffic accidents resulted.
Strong storm winds in Orange County were sustained at 30 to 40 mph. 
Gusts reached 70 mph at Newport Beach and 60 mph at Huntington Beach. 
Gusts to 60 mph were common in the mountains. 
Trees were down, power was out, and damage occurred across Orange and San Diego Counties. 
One illegal immigrant died in Jamul.

1940: Ben Lomond received 6.46" of rain.

1897: The morning low temperature at Reno, NV, was -3° F, its all-time record low temperature for March.

1879: The high temperature of 99° F at San Diego was the highest on record for March.

Source: NWS San Francisco/Monterey, Hanford, Reno, & San Diego

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Posted by: Kim Noyes <kimnoyes@gmail.com>


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Tuesday, March 28, 2017

[Geology2] Re: Colossal crystals, gigantic geodes: Selling ‘mind-boggling



The value of collectible rocks and minerals,has been going up faster than the inflation rate of our currency for a long time and doesn't show any signs of leveling off.  A palm-sized skull of a Permian reptile I picked up on a paleo class field trip in Oklahoma 40 years ago, sold on Ebay recently for $400 even though it was a very poor display specimen.  Hundreds of skeletons in that area had been collected by museums starting back in the 1940s, to the point that it is now very difficult to find any bones at all (outside of museum storage bins). The same is true for the old dinosaur bone hunting localities in the western US, most of which have been well culled.  The Chinese are making a big push to build up their scientific institutions, and I found that my little skull had gone to  an institute in China that topped out on the bidding.  The fact is, erosion is a slow process, and new items are exposed at a slow rate.  It took a while, but once we humans started to pick them up they began to get rarer and more pricey.  Not that there aren't any good hunting grounds left but many are too remote for must of us. 

Dinosaur eggs are an interesting case.  It was big news back in the late 90's when a dinosaur nesting area with lots of eggs was found in Montana, but they were fragile, belonged only to the provenance of academia, and the idea of owning a dino egg was way out of my income bracket. But then,not much later, an even bigger field was found in China and suddenly dinosaur eggs were a hot item on Ebay. and they were selling dirt cheap.  For $120 I bought an item so rare that only a few people in the world owned one.  I had no hesitation that it was worth the money; the only thing I hesitated on was whether I should buy two.  Or three.  Or more.  I was sure that they were undervalued and the price would go up.  Around that time China had some restrictions on exporting various natural items, including fossils, but I was provided a certificate by the importer saying it was all legal.  When I looked up dinosaur eggs for sale on Ebay the other day I found there are still a few for sale now but cost about $600 for one comparable to mine.  Geeze, I wish I'd bought a dozen.  I suspect that the Chinese realized they could get a lot more money from their fossils and they have limited exports to raise the price.  They should be able to keep that going for quite a while, since the source area is estimated to contain millions of the eggs and could be a long term source of income for the country. 

Clay  


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Posted by: Clay Chesney <fossrme@yahoo.com>



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[californiadisasters] On This Date In California Weather History (March 28)



2006: Two tornadoes in Merced within 24 minutes of each other.
The first touched down and tour the roof off a farm maintenance shop and was rated an F0.
A second F0 tornado in Merced caused minimal damage and lasted for 2/10 of a mile on the ground.
Another F0 tornado hit on the same day west of Atwater causing roof damage and tossing farm equipment.

1998:
The coldest storm during this El Niño year started on this day and ended on 3.29.
One to three feet of snow fell above 5000 feet, 4"-8" of snow fell above 3000 feet.
Ice pellets and hail accumulated to 1" deep in some coastal and foothill areas.
Considerable damage to crops was incurred.
Serious traffic accidents resulted.
On this day a funnel cloud was observed in Dulzura.
Strong storm winds in Orange County were sustained at 30 to 40 mph.
Gusts reached 70 mph at Newport Beach and 60 mph at Huntington Beach.
Gusts to 60 mph were common in the mountains.
Trees were down, power was out, and damage occurred across Orange and San Diego Counties.
One illegal immigrant died in Jamul.

1998: A cold storm brought snow flurries to Summerlin, NV, and North Las Vegas, NV.
2.5" of snow fell at Spring Mountain Ranch State Park in Nevada.

1998: An F0 tornado touched down at the Chowchilla airport.
Two belt loaders were moved 25 feet.
In Tulare County, some 1250 acres of plum orchards saw fruit damage from small hail totaling $5 million.

1997: A thunderstorm produced a microburst in Lake Elsinore that uprooted a tree and caused extensive roof damage.

1993: Funnel clouds were observed starting on 3.26 and ending on this day.
Two were seen near Temecula and one was observed in Moreno Valley.

1982: An F1 tornado touched down near Selma moving a trailer 50 feet and destroying an old shed.
Hail, up to golf ball size, fell and covered the ground from 1 mile south of Fresno to Kingsburg.
In parts of Selma, hail was as deep as 4" and rooftops and yards remained covered in hail the next morning.
Farms were hard hit as the hail damaged and stripped crops, scarred fruit on trees and stripped buds off others.
The hail damage compounded with a late-season frost on April 7th the same year resulted in $122.2 million in crop damage in Fresno County.

1979: A massive, wet storm produced record daily rainfall in most locations in Southern California.

1975: The high temperature at Reno, NV, was only 38° F.

1964: Four tsunami waves rolled into Crescent City, CA, overnight as a result of a M9.2 earthquake off the coast of Alaska last night.
12 people and 100 injured in the fourth and final wave which had a maximum run-up of about 20 feet.
60 blocks of town were inundated with half of them destroyed and 289 buildings. Over 1000 cars were destroyed along with 25 fishing vessels.

1964: A M9.2 earthquake hit Alaska, sending a tsunami to all of California.
In San Diego a two-foot maximum amplitude was measured and a 6.4 foot rise was observed in 10 minutes.
Minor damage resulted.

1946:  24" of snow fell at Tahoe City west shore Lake Tahoe)

1903: Fort Ross received 4.31" of rain.

Source: NWS San Francisco/Monterey, Hanford, Reno, Las Vegas, & San Diego and Kimmer's Disaster Lexicon

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Posted by: Kim Noyes <kimnoyes@gmail.com>


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[Volcano_Vista_HS] VVHS Parent Advisory--April Volunteer Opportunities



Hello amazing VVHS Parents!

 

VVHS Parent Advisory needs your help for upcoming April events.  Reply to this message with questions or to let us know how you can help!

 

 

Top 10 Dinner, Tuesday, April 4:

 

-We need help setting up and decorating starting at 4 in the hall in front of the PAC if anyone is available.   

 

 

Prom, Saturday, April 8:

 

-We need 15 cases of Aquafina water donated (the only brand we can sell) for water sales at Prom.  Label with student's name and "Parent Advisory" and you can drop off in VVHS office or with Parent Advisory Board Member starting tomorrow

 

-We also need volunteers to help with Water Sales and Coat Check at Prom 7:30-11PM the night of the dance, at Sid Cutter Pavilion at Balloon Fiesta Park.   If you can only stay for part of the time, that is fine.  Any help would be appreciated.

 

 

Thank you in advance for your help!  We appreciate your commitment to the staff and students at Volcano Vista!



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Posted by: ssteckbeck@yahoo.com


For more information, go to our web site: http://www.volcanovistahawks.com




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Monday, March 27, 2017

[californiadisasters] 1964 Crescent City Tsunami, Tuesday, 28 March 2017



"1964 Crescent City Tsunami" reminder
When
Tuesday, 28 March 2017
08:00 AM to 08:00 AM
(GMT) Greenwich Mean Time - Dublin / Edinburgh / Lisbon / London
Where
Coastal Del Norte County
Notes
On this night in 1964 the infamous Crescent City Tsunami rampaged into town killing 10 people and generating tremendous damage upwards of $15 million. The tsunami was caused by a massive (moment magnitude 9.2, Richter 8.4) "Good Friday" earthquake centered in Girdwood (south of Anchorage) Alaska. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Good_Friday_Earthquake
From
californiadisasters   Calendar


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Re: [Geology2] Rock stars: Mined masterpieces

--------------------------------------------
On Tue, 3/28/17, Glen Miller destravlr@yahoo.com [geology2] <geology2@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

Subject: Re: [Geology2] Rock stars: Mined masterpieces
To: geology2@yahoogroups.com
Date: Tuesday, March 28, 2017, 5:22 AM


 









Thanks for the post, Kim.



Glen













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4 oct. - Intra in vigoare Carta O.N.U. 16 nov. - Crearea UNESCO. 20 nov. 1945-1 oct. 1946 - Procesul de la Niirenberg. 29 nov. - Proclamarea de catre Tito losip B. -1892-1980 a R.P. Iugoslavia.


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Re: [Geology2] Rock stars: Mined masterpieces

Thanks for the post, Kim.

Glen



------------------------------------
Posted by: Glen Miller <destravlr@yahoo.com>
------------------------------------


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[Volcano_Vista_HS] VVHS Announcements--Monday, March 27, 2017



We will be on a long assembly schedule tomorrow to recognize all of our State Champions:

Publications

Boys Basketball

Mock Trial

Technology Student Association

 

BIG CONGRATULATIONS to the Volcano Vista Mock Trial Team! The state championship tournament was held on March 17 and 18.

Black-Team attorney Sitara Haynes received one of the outstanding attorney awards.  Juliette Wheelock, of the Platinum team, won the Zamzok award as the tournament's most outstanding attorney, and Rhonda Hall won the Zamzok award for witnesses!

To our knowledge, this is the first time that both Zamzok awards have gone to the same school. Maybe more importantly, our Black team finished third. Between the state qualifying tournament and the state tournament, our Black team went six and one---with their only loss being to our Platinum team! And speaking of which, the Platinum team defeated Albuquerque Academy in the championship round to win the whole sha-bang! Congratulations to both teams, and now it's on to Hartford, Connecticut and the National Tournament for our Platinum team! Good luck!

 

ATHLETICS:

Golf: has a match tomorrow at 8 at Arroyo del Oso course.

 

And remember

As always

It's Great to be a Hawk!



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Posted by: ssteckbeck@yahoo.com


For more information, go to our web site: http://www.volcanovistahawks.com




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[Geology2] Rock stars: Mined masterpieces



Rock stars: Mined masterpieces



Crystals like amethyst are the ROCK STARS of mineralogy -- and one collector's particular obsession Tracy Smith shows us the goods:

Seattle, Washington wears its natural beauty out in the open. But the views can be just as stunning indoors if you know where to look.

In a neighborhood not far from the city, there's a warehouse that looks like Mother Nature's private museum. For security reasons we can't reveal the location, for inside are giant crystals, some the size of a compact car. Perfect formations, in brilliant white or clear as glacial ice.

Smith said, "When I think of crystals, I think of those little, dainty things that people wear around their necks."

"This is not one of those," laughed collector Richard Berger, who found one 7,000-lb. specimen in Namibia.

giant-crystal-richard-berger-tracy-smith-620.jpg

Richard Berger shows Tracy Smith a crystal the size of a small car.

CBS News

Berger has spent his adult life -- and, he says, most of his money -- chasing the biggest, most perfect specimens he could find.

And he's especially proud of concretions: great swirling masses of rock from Fontainebleau, France, formed into fantastical shapes when ancient hot springs suddenly cooled -- as if liquid was suddenly frozen.

fountainbleu-crystal-660.jpg

A crystal from Fontainebleau, France.

CBS News

"It went from water to rock in minutes," said Berger.

And what might be more amazing is how Berger's rocks have transformed him.

In 1968, he was a Philadelphia medical student on a road trip across America when he happened across a tiny shack in Wyoming with crystals for sale. "And I saw this little piece, and it's the most beautiful thing I'd ever seen, right? And I was completely enchanted by it."

So enchanted, in fact, that he dropped out of medical school and basically roamed the Earth buying the biggest and most startling things ever dug up.

One -- that is actually the fossilized bottom of a tropical lake – is imprinted with ancient fish around a palm frond, dug up in what is now Wyoming. "This is a photographic memory of life on planet Earth 52 million years ago," he said.

And another quartz crystal formation looks like it came straight off a "Superman" movie set.

"This is from Krypton, also known as Arkansas," Berger said.

crystal-closeup-620.jpg

Richard Berger has spent his life amassing a monumental collection of crystals, some the size of a car.

CBS News

Some believe that just handling a crystal can have a healing effect, and they have long been symbols of power. Just look at the crowns used in British coronations.

"And what's on their head?" said Berger. "Mostly diamonds, rubies, sapphires, emeralds, crystals that have been cut into a variety of shapes, and made into a hat."

He's never owned a crown, but by 1977 Berger had collected enough crystals to open a store in his native New York City.  

Miriam Dyak and her girlfriend were customers one day in 1982. "He thought my friend was cute; he didn't really notice me," Miriam said.

"Paid no attention to her whatsoever," Richard said. "I made up for it, though!"

Long story short, they married in 1985. And as their relationship grew, so did Richard's collection.

"Are there times, Miriam, where you have to say to Richard, 'Enough is enough'?" Smith asked.

"Oh, I've tried! I don't think I'm very effective at that," Miriam replied.

To which Richard added, "I say that's an understatement."

They've managed to make a living selling a piece here and there, but most of their money has gone back into this collection -- which they say has now become too expensive for them to keep.

"I mean, yes, we need to sell it, 'cause otherwise we'd have nothing," Miriam said.

Richard said, "This represents a very, very significant investment. But that doesn't mean that we left enough for ourselves, right, to live that comfortably. So, you know, we have our 15-year-old car, and we have no stock portfolio, and we don't own a house. And we live in a 315-square-foot apartment."

"Yeah, the crystals get 6,000 square feet," Miriam said.

"Right, and we are sitting on the greatest collection of giant crystals in the world."

blue-crystal-620.jpg

A specimen from Richard Berger's collection.

CBS News

They're hoping to sell it all to someone who will keep the collection intact, and build a museum around it. Berger won't quote a price, except to say it's in the multi-millions.

They've had offers, but only for individual pieces, like the Wyoming lake bottom.

"We had somebody, six months ago, who wanted to put it in the lobby of a new Sheraton they were building," Berger said.

And you said? "No. With five cents in the bank, I said no to selling that, right? Because we're trying to hold the integrity of this collection together. And we don't want to sell off iconic pieces. At a certain point, if that becomes improbable to sustain, then you go, 'All right, enough of this.'"

But not yet.

After all, they're not just rocks: To Berger, they're the foundation of a dream he wants to share with the world.

"It's a way of inspiring people, right?" he said. "It's about inspiration. I think what the world needs right now more than just about anything is inspiration."

Source: http://www.cbsnews.com/news/rock-stars-crystals-mined-masterpieces/


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Posted by: Kim Noyes <kimnoyes@gmail.com>



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[Geology2] Colossal crystals, gigantic geodes: Selling ‘mind-boggling’ collection no easy task



Colossal crystals, gigantic geodes: Selling 'mind-boggling' collection no easy task


Lots of kids collect minerals, but Richard Berger wasn't one of them.

The Bronx native didn't see his first chunk of quartz until he was in his 20s. Disillusioned with medical school, Berger was driving cross-country in 1968 when he spotted a rickety sign on a back road in Wyoming. It said "rock shop."

"I went inside and saw this tiny crystal on a shelf," he recalled. "I thought it was the most exquisite thing I had ever encountered."

More than four decades later, Berger and his wife have amassed one of the world's premier private collections of crystals, fossils and other natural formations — none of which could be described as "tiny."

There's an amethyst geode the size of a Smart car and a fossil mollusk called an ammonite that measures nearly 4 feet across. A cluster of pyrite crystals tips the scale at 700 pounds and bounces light like a disco ball. A crystalline quartz giant weighs in at 3.5 tons and seems to glow from within.

The collection, which Berger calls "The Masterpieces of the Earth," includes more than 100 specimens, all selected for their exceptional size, beauty or quality. And it's on the market.

A bullseye agate from Montana mimics the shape of a bird's egg.  (Steve Ringman / The Seattle Times)
A bullseye agate from Montana mimics the shape of a bird's egg. (Steve Ringman / The Seattle Times)

But Berger doesn't want to just sell to the highest bidder. His dream is to find a way to keep the collection in the Northwest and build a museum to house it.

"Every time I think about it leaving the country, my heart sinks," said Berger, who has already received several offers from China. "I would like to see it become part of the cultural legacy of Seattle."

The city is no stranger to billionaires bankrolling museums. Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen's EMP Museum celebrates rock 'n' roll, while fellow Microsoft alum Charles Simonyi paid for a gallery devoted to space exploration at the Museum of Flight.

But it's not clear who might step up in support of minerals and fossils.

"Selling mineral collections is not an easy business, and there are very few buyers," said Elizabeth Nesbitt, curator of geology for the Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture at the University of Washington. "Some museums across the country are selling their own mineral collections," she wrote in an email.

But others, like the Perot Museum of Nature and Science in Dallas and Yale's Peabody Museum of Natural History, are expanding their mineralogy sections in a big way.

Berger stands next to a 13-foot fossil wall of fish around a palm frond. It was excavated from a quarry in Wyoming. (Steve Ringman / The Seattle Times)
Berger stands next to a 13-foot fossil wall of fish around a palm frond. It was excavated from a quarry in Wyoming. (Steve Ringman / The Seattle Times)

"The appeal of minerals has gone from being something that's very specialist to something that's more mainstream," said Peabody Director David Skelly, who recently bought two pieces from Berger to help anchor the museum's new mineral hall, including a massive selenite rose, whose flat, brown crystals resemble the fins on a stegosaurus's back.

"These are the kind of things that just stop you in your tracks," Skelly said. "Richard's specimens, among the many I've seen, have that kind of showstopping quality to them."

Deep pockets needed

Berger won't reveal the asking price for his collection, except to say that it's in the millions of dollars. Very few museums can even afford to buy a single large specimen without donor support, Skelly pointed out. Yale's expansion is being underwritten by a $4 million gift from a wealthy alumnus.

The Burke doesn't have that kind of money for collections either, and it is generally more focused on specimens with scientific, rather than aesthetic, value, said executive director Julie Stein. There are also ethical concerns about buying and selling fossils because it feeds the market that can place scientifically valuable specimens in private, rather than public, hands, she added.

But the Burke, which is breaking ground soon on a larger building, would consider accepting Berger's collection — if a donor picked up the tab, Stein said.

For now, the glittering assemblage is mostly in the dark, stored in a 6,000-square-foot warehouse near Seattle that is not open to the public. Berger and his wife live in a 315-square-foot cottage to minimize expenses.

"Every dime that I have, all of my assets since 1980, have gone into this collection," he said.

First enchanted by a tiny crystal in 1968, Berger now has this half-ton quartz cluster from Arkansas, approximately 180 million years old. (Steve Ringman / The Seattle Times)
First enchanted by a tiny crystal in 1968, Berger now has this half-ton quartz cluster from Arkansas, approximately 180 million years old. (Steve Ringman / The Seattle Times)
An amalgamation of golden calcite, violet fluorite crystals, dark-colored sphalerite and white barite, discovered 1,800 feet underground in an industrial zinc mine in Tennessee. (Steve Ringman / The Seattle Times)
An amalgamation of golden calcite, violet fluorite crystals, dark-colored sphalerite and white barite, discovered 1,800 feet underground in an industrial zinc mine in Tennessee. (Steve Ringman / The Seattle Times)

'Mind-boggling'

After his epiphany in Wyoming, Berger dropped out of medical school and began searching for evermore elaborate crystals and fossils. In the 1980s, he operated a successful gallery in Manhattan, selling fossils and minerals for a living — and to finance his quest for natural masterpieces.

The couple moved to Seattle in 1988, transporting their collection in five tractor-trailers. They opened a gallery in the Alexis Hotel and ran it until 1995, when they began dealing with only select clients, including museums.

More information

For more information on the collection or to contact Richard Berger, visit his website.

Most of the pieces in the collection were unearthed at industrial mining operations, Berger said. In the early days, he traveled the world, from Tennessee to the Peruvian Andes, to sort through the finds. But the specimens he wanted were exceedingly rare, and eventually people started contacting him when they stumbled across something unique.

One such find came from Fontainebleau, France. People in the region had been mining ancient deposits of white sand since the Middle Ages. But in the late 1980s, the deposits began yielding fantastical, swirling formations that look like psychedelic ice cream cones.

"They are mind-boggling," Berger said during a recent tour of his collection. "You might ask yourself: Who made these, Michelangelo, or the Earth?"

Called Fontainebleau concretions, the smooth, cream-colored formations were apparently created when ancient hot springs erupted through the sand, suspending the fine particles in a waterborne dance that was somehow preserved.

Berger was so enchanted, he bought every specimen he could find.

Richard Berger holds a light to the back of a Fontainebleau sandstone concretion, one of many he has in the collection.  (Steve Ringman / The Seattle Times)
Richard Berger holds a light to the back of a Fontainebleau sandstone concretion, one of many he has in the collection. (Steve Ringman / The Seattle Times)

United Nations of minerals

Another major discovery was a wall-sized fossil tableau excavated from a quarry in Wyoming. It's like a photographic imprint of an ancient lake bottom, with two dozen long-dead fish that appear to swim around a giant palm frond.

Berger's monster ammonites were dug up in the Chihuahuan Desert of Mexico. Several of the biggest quartz crystals in the collection were pulled out of the ground in the Southwest African nation of Namibia. The car-sized geode was unearthed in Brazil.

"This is like the U.N. of the planet itself," Berger said. "It's a gathering of ambassadors of the Earth."

The time period reflected in the collection is also vast.

Some of the crystals are more than half a billion years old, while others are younger than the age of the dinosaurs. One slab of sedimentary rock fished from the intertidal zone off an Alaskan island juxtaposes frostlike crystals that date back 200 million years with modern-day barnacles.

Berger hopes any new owner will keep the collection intact. And with his artistic flair, he envisions a tailor-made exhibit space with dramatic lighting, greenery and spots where visitors could sit and contemplate.

"My core desire, and the reason I built this, was for it to be an experience that tens of thousands of people can enjoy, in a place of peace and beauty," Berger said. "I just want to alert Seattle to the fact that this exists and give it my best shot to see if there is any interest in keeping it here."

Richard Berger feels a 7,000-pound crystal from his collection of massive minerals. He hopes to keep it in the Northwest.  (Steve Ringman / The Seattle Times)
Richard Berger feels a 7,000-pound crystal from his collection of massive minerals. He hopes to keep it in the Northwest. (Steve Ringman / The Seattle Times)

Source: http://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/science/colossal-crystals-gigantic-geodes-selling-mind-boggling-collection-no-easy-task/


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Posted by: Kim Noyes <kimnoyes@gmail.com>



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[californiadisasters] On This Date In California Weather History (March 27)



2015: The high temperature in San Diego reached 82° F, the seventh day during this month of March that the temperature met or exceeded 80° F.
This broke the previous March record of five days for that to occur.
The average high in March is 65.6° F.

2007:
A microbust hit the Fullerton Airport.
Top recorded winds were only 30 mph, but spotters estimated winds of at least 45 mph.
An aviation building lost its roof.
Another thunderstorm wind knocked down a large Eucalyptus tree onto three cars in Encinitas, causing two injuries.
A funnel cloud was spotted off the La Jolla coast.

1993: Funnel clouds were observed starting on 3.26 and ending on 3.28.
Two were seen near Temecula and one was observed in Moreno Valley.

1991: Beginning on the evening of March 26th and continuing into the 27th snow fell and accumulated in the Kern County desert with as much as 8.5" at Randsburg.
Other amounts included 3.1" at Mojave with a trace at China Lake NAS.

1991: A strong winter storm produced heavy snow, dropping 36" at Lake Arrowhead, 27" at Big Bear Lake (the greatest daily amount on record) and 18.5" at Idyllwild.
An avalanche of snow isolated 100 people in Big Bear Lake by blocking Highway 18.
Tornadoes hit Huntington Beach and rural San Marcos.
The tornado in Huntington Beach cut a five-mile swath and blew off roofs of six homes.
Dozens of other homes were damaged and 50 mobile homes were severely damaged.
In 24 hours, 1.8" of rain fell in Escondido, 1.71" in Poway, 1.56" in Fallbrook, 1.55" in La Mesa, 1.52" in Ramona, 1.48" in El Cajon, and 1.09" in San Diego.
Golf courses and shopping centers were flooded by the San Diego River in Mission Valley.
Flooding damaged Highway 78 east of the San Diego Wild Animal Park.

1988: Santa Ana weather brought 90° F+ temperatures all over the region starting 3.25 and ending on this day.
It was 102° F in Santee on 3.25, 97° F throughout the San Diego Valleys on all three days, and 90° F in San Diego on 3.26.
Several brush fires resulted.
It was 101° F in Borrego Springs, the highest temperature on record for March.
This also occurred on 3.31.1989.
This is also the earliest date in the season that the temperature hit the century mark.

1966: The high temperature at Reno, NV, was 75° F.

1963: Healdsburg received 3.29" of rain.

1958: A well-defined funnel cloud was observed by a U.S. Weather Bureau Meteorologist while traveling by train 5 miles northeast of Chowchilla.
The funnel extended from a ceiling around 2,500 feet to about 300 feet from the ground.

1907: The morning low temperature at Bridgeport was -7° F.

Source: NWS San Francisco/Monterey, Reno, Hanford, & San Diego

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Posted by: Kim Noyes <kimnoyes@gmail.com>


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