Friday, September 20, 2019

[CaliforniaDisasters] On This Date In California Weather History (September 19)

1997: A hiker died of hypothermia after being caught in the a snowstorm in Fresno County portion of the Southern Sierra Nevada Mountains. 
The base camp was at the 12,000 foot elevation west of Bishop (Inyo County).
The hiker and a friend were unprepared for winter-like weather. 
Their sleeping bags and gear got wet in the storm. 
The hiker died in the Inyo County hospital at 1:30 PM PST on Friday the 19th.

1989: An exceptionally cold storm system for September swept down the California coast and brought early season snows to the San Gabriel and San Bernardino Mountains, including 4"-5" in Running Springs and Lake Arrowhead.
Big Bear Lake reported 1.5" of snow, the earliest measurable snowfall of the season on record.
The snow led to several traffic accidents along Highway 18 and 330.

1984: Over 1" of rain fell in just 45 minutes in Lake Isabella washing out a ¼ mile of a road, covering others with mud and destroying 2 mobile homes.

1984: A tropical air mass lasting two weeks and high sea surface temperatures led to record minimum temperature records set each day except one at San Diego starting on 9.4 and ending on this day.
Low temperatures ranged from 73° F to the highest minimum of all time of 78° F on 9.9 and 9.17.
The high was 100° F on 9.8.

1965: The morning low temperature at Reno, NV was a cold 20° F.

1963: Northeastward moving Tropical Storm Katherine made landfall in northern Baja California with rainfall of up to 6.5" in the mountains from 9.17 to this day.
3.86" fell in San Bernardino, 3.44" in Riverside, 2.66" in Victorville and Cuyamaca, 1.9" in San Diego, 1.88" in Indio, and 1.62" in Santa Ana.
Disastrous flooding and erosion hit a northern San Bernardino neighborhood.

1962: Needles, CA recorded a high temperature of 111° F, setting a daily record. 

1959: Palo Alto received 1.78" of rain.

1952: A west-northwestward moving tropical storm southwest of Baja California dissipated.
Moisture from this storm resulted in rainfall of up to 2" in the mountains and deserts starting on this day and ending on 9.21, with most falling on this day.
This occurred during the El Niño of 1951-52.

1939: A heat wave that started on 9.18 and ended on 9.22 preceded the arrival of a tropical storm called "El Cordonazo."
High temperature records of more than 95° F occurred at San Diego each day, with the highest temperature reaching 106° F on 9.21.
A tropical cyclone moving northwestward, just off the west coast of Mexico, moved into southern Baja California and dissipated.
The moisture from this tropical cyclone generated rainfall of up to 3" in the deserts and mountains starting on this day and ending on 9.21.

Source: NWS San Francisco/Monterey, Hanford, Reno, Las Vegas, & San Diego

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[CaliforniaDisasters] On This Date In California Weather History (September 18)

1999: The "Williams Fire" 9 miles NNE of Lodgepole in Tulare County was caused by lightning strikes on 9/18 but was allowed to burn and managed as a "resource" burn through October (although truncated for report purposes in September). 
It burned a total of 500 acres. 
No fatalities or structures lost. 

1997: A hiker died of hypothermia after being caught in the a snowstorm in Fresno County portion of the Southern Sierra Nevada Mountains. 
The base camp was at the 12,000 foot elevation west of Bishop (Inyo County).
The hiker and a friend were unprepared for winter-like weather. 
Their sleeping bags and gear got wet in the storm. 
The hiker died in the Inyo County hospital at 1:30 PM PST on Friday the 19th.

1985: A tornado was reported around the north shore of the Salton Sea.

1985: During a severe thunderstorm, a funnel cloud was reported over the central portion of Yuma, AZ.
Strong winds produced damage to some homes and at least 1 business.
Winds were strong enough to force a 2x4 through a stucco wall.

1984: Fresno's warmest low temperature on record for September is set, 78°.

1982: The remnants of Hurricane Norman tracked northeastward across northern Baja California into Arizona with scattered rainfall amounts up to 1" in the southern mountains and deserts on 9.17 and on this day.
This occurred during the strong El Niño of 1982-83.

1966: There was darkness at noon in Las Vegas, NV, and surrounding areas when heavy rains and high winds ripped through town, causing extensive damage and injuring several people.
Hardest hit by the storm were three trailer parks on the east side of town. Residents of Riviera Vegas Mobile Home Park for adults and the adjoining family park on Palm Avenue were literally picking up the pieces of two trailers which were "disintegrated" in the wind.
Miracle Mile Trailer Park on Boulder Highway reported two trailers blown over, a roof blown away, and a car demolished.

1963: Tropical Storm Jennifer-Katherine made landfall in northern Baja California (the storm has two names because forecasters thought the storm had dissipated, but later reformed).
The storm brought heavy rains to the region over a 3-day period centered on this day.
Up to 6.5" of rain fell in the mountains, 3.86" fell in San Bernardino, 3.66" in Victorville, 3.29" in Riverside,1.44" in Palm Springs,and 1" in San Diego.
Disastrous flooding and erosion hit parts of San Bernardino.

1959: Woodfords, CA (Alpine Co.), recorded 2.60" of precipitation.

1959: Ben Lomond received 8.35" of rain and San Jose received 2" of rain.

1939: A heat wave that started on this day and ended on 9.22 preceded the arrival of a tropical storm called "El Cordonazo."
High temperature records of more than 95° occurred at San Diego each day, with the highest temperature reaching 106° on 9.21.

1929: A tropical cyclone moved north northwest just off the west coast of Baja California, dissipating off the coast of northern Baja California.
Rainfall of up to 4" occurred in the southern mountains and deserts of Southern California on this day.

1924: It was 38° F in Escondido, the lowest temperature on record for September. 

Source: NWS San Francisco/Monterey, Hanford, Las Vegas, Reno, Phoenix, & San Diego

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[CaliforniaDisasters] On This Date In California Weather History (September 17)

2008: A tornado was observed over Johnson Valley (east of Apple Valley), but no damage was reported.

2000: Big Sur had a high temperature of 91° F.

1996: Mount Charleston (northwest of Las Vegas, NV, near CA-NV border) recorded a low temperature of 17° F. This tied the record for the all time coldest low temperature in September.

1984:
A tropical air mass lasting two weeks and high sea surface temperatures led to record minimum temperature records set each day except one at San Diego starting on 9.4 and ending on 9.19.
Low temperatures ranged from 73° F to the highest minimum of all time of 78° F on this day and on 9.9.
The high was 100° F on 9.8.

1982: The remnants of Hurricane Norman tracked northeastward across northern Baja California into Arizona with scattered rainfall amounts up to one inch in the southern mountains and deserts on this day and on 9.18.
This occurred during the strong El Niño of 1982-83.

1965: The morning low temperature at Reno, NV  was 23° F.

1963: Northeastward moving Tropical Storm Katherine made landfall in northern Baja California with rainfall of up to 6.50" in the mountains from this day to 9.19.
3.86" fell in San Bernardino, 3.44" in Riverside, 2.66" in Victorville and Cuyamaca, 1.90" in San Diego, 1.88" in Indio, and 1.62" in Santa Ana.
Disastrous flooding and erosion hit a northern San Bernardino neighborhood.

1963: Remnants from Tropical Storm Katherine move into western Arizona.
2.42" of rain is observed in Yuma, AZ, causing severe damage to cars, homes, and businesses. Severe losses to Cotton/Alfalfa/Lettuce crops

1957: Fresno recorded 0.19" of rain on this date.
This made September 1957 the wettest September in Fresno in 27 years.

1929: A tropical air mass enveloped Southern California.
The Meteorologist in Charge at San Diego reported temperatures of 111° F in the coastal valleys on 9.16.
A reading of 94° F was at San Diego at 4 am on this day.

1913: Santa Ana conditions produced a high of 110° F at San Diego, which was the all time record high temperature until 9.26.1963 (when it hit 111° F).
An unofficial report of 127° F came from San Bernardino.
One died, a carpenter working outside.
A few small fires occurred, including one downtown that destroyed one house.
Santa Barbara established an all-time high of 108° F.

Source: NWS San Francisco/Monterey, Hanford, Reno, Las Vegas, Phoenix, & San Diego

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Thursday, September 19, 2019

[CaliforniaDisasters] Upcoming Events #cal-summary

California Disasters Upcoming Events

2002 Williams Fire Anniversary

When:
Sunday, 22 September 2019

Where:
San Gabriel Mountains - Los Angeles County

Organizer: Kim Patrick Noyes

Details:
The Williams Fire began its rampage near Williams Camp in the East Fork San Gabriel River above Glendora. By the time that fire was contained, it had charred 38,094 acres and destroyed 63 residences and 14 outbuildings. The Williams Fire burned into the remnants of the Curve Fire and became known as the Curve-Williams Complex, burning more than 58,951 combined acres.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2002_California_wildfires and
https://danshikingblog.blogspot.com/2012/09/curve-fire-remembered-ten-years-later.html

View Event


2009 Guiberson Fire Anniversary

When:
Sunday, 22 September 2019

Where:
Santa Susana Mountains - Ventura County

Organizer: Kim Patrick Noyes

Details:
The Guiberson Fire was a wildfire that burned from September 22 until September 27, 2009 in Guiberson Canyon of the western Santa Susana Mountains, between Fillmore and Moorpark in Ventura County, California.

The Guiberson Fire, which started between Fillmore and Moorpark, caused the evacuation of almost 600 homes in Meridian Hills and Bardsdale with about 1,000 structures threatened, in addition to oil pipelines in the area. The cause of the fire is still unknown.

The fire destroyed an estimated 17,500 acres (71 km2), destroying an outbuilding and injuring 10 firefighters. On day two of the fire Governor Schwarzenegger declared a state of emergency.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guiberson_Fire

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1889 Santiago Canyon Fire Anniversary

When:
Tuesday, 24 September 2019

Where:
Peninsular Ranges - Orange, Riverside, & San Diego Counties

Organizer: Kim Patrick Noyes

Details:
The Santiago Canyon Fire of 1889 (previously called the Great Fire of 1889) was a massive wildfire in California, which burned large parts of Orange County, Riverside County, and San Diego County during the last week of September 1889. Until 2018, it was possibly the single largest wildfire in the recorded history of California, with at least 300,000 acres (1,200 km2) of land burned.[3] In mid-August 2018, the Ranch Fire in the Mendocino Complex Fire surpassed the Santiago Canyon Fire in size.

Assistant Regional Forester (USFS) L.A. Barrett, who wrote a 1935 report on California wildfires, said of it: "I was living in Orange County at the time and well remember the great fire reported herein from September 24 to 26. Nothing like it occurred in California since the National Forests have been administered. In fact in my 33 years in the Service I have never seen a forest or brush fire to equal it. This one covered an enormous scope of country and burned very rapidly."

Conditions leading up to the 1889 fire included a much longer and more severe annual drought than usual, with rains largely ceasing in March and less than 0.4 inches (1 cm) of precipitation being recorded for the 5½ months prior (records from the National Archives). This was coupled with multiple katabatic wind events (known as “northers” or Santa Anas) that month, one of which occurred about 10 days prior and likely added to the dryness of fuels. Temperatures during the week prior remained high and were coupled with several severe fires in San Diego County in which “at least 10,000 acres [40 km2] have burned over, a dwelling house consumed and other property destroyed”

In addition to the Santiago Canyon Fire, there were several other significant fires fanned by the same gale force Santa Ana winds in San Diego and San Bernardino counties. The Santiago Canyon Fire was the largest and has been estimated as being greater than 308,000 acres (1,250 km2). Another wildfire in San Diego County at the time has been estimated to have been greater than 60,000 acres (240 km2). The Orange County fire burned through areas of chaparral and coastal sage scrub, as well as a number of farm fields in the Santa Ana Valley, where farmers attempted to control the fire by plowing ahead of it.[8] A detailed analysis of the fire can be found in an article by Keeley and Zedler.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Santiago_Canyon_Fire

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1978 PSA 182 Crash Anniversary

When:
Wednesday, 25 September 2019

Where:
San Diego - San Diego County

Organizer: Kim Patrick Noyes

Details:
Pacific Southwest Airlines (PSA) Flight 182 was a Boeing 727-214 commercial airliner, registration, N533PS that collided with a private Cessna 172 light aircraft, registration, N7711G over San Diego, California, at 9:01 am on Monday, September 25, 1978. It was Pacific Southwest Airlines' first fatal accident.

Both aircraft crashed into North Park, a San Diego neighborhood. Flight 182 impacted just north of the intersection of Dwight and Nile, killing all 135 people aboard the aircraft and seven people on the ground in houses, including two children. The Cessna impacted on Polk Ave. between 32nd St. and Iowa St. killing the two on board. Nine others on the ground were injured and 22 homes were destroyed or damaged by the impact and debris.

 
WendtPSA.jpg
PSA182 seconds after the collision with Cessna 172.
Accident
Date 25 September 1978
Summary Mid-air collision resulting from pilot error and ATC error
Site San Diego, California, United States
Total fatalities 144
Total injuries 9


Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PSA_Flight_182

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1970 Clampitt Fire Anniversary

When:
Wednesday, 25 September 2019

Where:
Santa Susana Mountains - Los Angeles & Ventura Counties

Organizer: Kim Patrick Noyes

Details:
The Clampitt fire broke out around 8 a.m. Friday, Sept. 25, near Clampitt Road in the Newhall Pass as a result of downed power lines. In Santa Ana winds clocked at 80 mph, it took less than a day for the fire to make a 20-mile run to the coast, tearing through Porter Ranch, the Simi Hills at Chatsworth, south to the 101 Freeway and on to Malibu Canyon. News reports initially called it the Chatsworth-Malibu Canyon fire because much of the destruction occurred there.

 


Burn area of the Clampitt (dark blue) and Wright (light blue) fires. Source: Master's thesis by Anthony D. Shafer, CSUN, May 2012. Click to enlarge.

By the time the smoke cleared, the Clampitt Fire had scorched 107,103 acres of brush and forest, destroyed 80 structures killed four civilians (source: University of California Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources). It still stands as L.A. County's deadliest wildfire in modern history and was the largest until 2009 when the Station Fire, which claimed the lives of two firemen, passed it in acreage. (Giant fires of indeterminate size in the San Gabriel Mountains in 1896 and 1919 may have been bigger; see Robinson 1977.)



The Clampitt Fire encroached on the historic buildings of Mentryville in Pico Canyon where an inmate camp crew and a single fire engine were on hand to save the barns and corrals while the resident Lagasse family helped keep the flames away from Alex Mentry's 1890s mansion and various outbuildings. Most of the structures made similarly narrow escapes in August 1962 and October 2003 (the Wolcott barn was lost in the 1962 fire).


Meanwhile in Chatsworth, the fire leveled the old movie-set buildings of the Spahn Ranch, where Charles Manson and his "family" had been living in 1968 and 1969.



Source: https://scvhistory.com/gif/galleries/fire092570/

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1993 Marre Fire Anniversary

When:
Wednesday, 25 September 2019

Where:
San Rafael Mountains - Santa Barbara County

Organizer: Kim Patrick Noyes

Details:
The Marre Fire started at approximately 3:30 pm on Saturday, September 25, 1993, on the Marre Ranch in the Los Padres National Forest. A hunter smoking a victory cigarette started the fire and was later charged with starting the fire and had to pay restitution.

Heavy fuels and high winds, coupled with low humidity, generated highly erratic fire behavior during the ensuing days. By September 27, the fire had burned 10,000+ acres of private and National Forest land. A Type 1 Incident Management Team, under the direction of Incident Commander Mike Dougherty, assumed command of the fire in a Unified Command structure with Santa Barbara County Fire Department. The Incident Commander for SBC was Division Chief Dan Gaither.

By September 30, the Marre Fire had burned approximately 32,500 acres, including a small portion of the San Rafael Wilderness. There were about 3,300 firefighters and support personnel assigned to the incident at this point. The west and south flanks of the fire appeared to be holding and the threat to private residences (including Michael Jackson's Neverland Ranch) was lessening. Early on the morning of Saturday, October 2, the fire jumped containment lines on the west flank, trapping several pieces of firefighting equipment and personnel in the process. From this point on, the northwest side of the fire, including Birabent Canyon and the Zaca drainage, became the area of greatest concern.

By Day 12, Thursday, October 7, 1993, the Marre Fire had burned approximately 42,700 acres, but the fire was 90% contained and heavy demobilization of firefighting resources was underway. On Friday, October 8, a Type 2 Incident Management Team took over command of the fire. Full containment was declared at 6 pm on that date.

Source: https://www.wildfirelessons.net/HigherLogic/System/DownloadDocumentFile.ashx?DocumentFileKey=4f339ee5-4eb4-485c-9916-a88c60e2b964

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1970 Wright Fire Anniversary

When:
Wednesday, 25 September 2019

Where:
Santa Monica Mountains - Los Angeles County

Organizer: Kim Patrick Noyes

Details:
The Wright (Malibu) Fire began on Sept. 25, 1970, in the Santa Monica Mountains along the Hwy 101 corridor and burned over the Santa Monica Mountains to the coast. The Wright Fire charred 27,925 acres and destroyed 103 homes (source: UCANR).


Source: https://scvhistory.com/gif/galleries/fire092570/

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1970 Laguna Fire Anniversary

When:
Thursday, 26 September 2019

Where:
Peninsular Ranges - San Diego County

Organizer: Kim Patrick Noyes

Details:
The Laguna Fire, previously known as the Kitchen Creek Fire and the Boulder Oaks Fire, occurred in 1970 in the Laguna Mountains and East County region of San Diego County in Southern California, United States.

It was the third-largest wildfire in the history of California at that time, after the Santiago Canyon Fire of 1889, and the Matilija Fire of 1932. It was one of many wildfires in a massive conflagration that spanned across the state from September 22 to October 4, 1970. The Laguna Fire of 1970 caused at least $234 million (1970 USD) in damages, including $5.6 million of damage to residential property.

The Laguna fire was started by downed power lines during Santa Ana winds in the Kitchen Creek area of the Laguna Mountains on the morning of September 26, 1970. In only 24 hours, it burned westward about 30 miles (48 km) to the outskirts of El Cajon and Spring Valley. The fire devastated the communities of Harbison Canyon and Crest. In the end, the fire burned 175,425 acres (709.92 km2) and 382 homes, killing 16 people.

The Laguna Fire was surpassed as the third-largest fire in California history by the 280,278-acre (1,134.24 km2) Cedar Fire in October 2003. It was surpassed as the fourth-largest by the 197,990-acre (801.2 km2) Witch Creek Fire in October 2007.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laguna_Fire

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1997 Williams Fire Anniversary

When:
Friday, 27 September 2019

Where:
Sierra Nevada Foothills - Yuba County

Organizer: Kim Patrick Noyes

Details:
The Williams Fire, a 5,743 acre fire started at approximately 3:04 pm on Saturday, September 27, 1997. The cause of the fire was determined to be an electrical short in a motor home. Operational resources fighting the fire were supplied by Cal Fire, USFS, and numerous Fire Districts and municipalities. Foresters from CHY Timber and Soper Wheeler were contacted to provide maps, air photos, and to help with contingency planning. Timber landowners used their own equipment to open old roads along the north side of the fire. Before the fire was contained 186 engines, 45 hand crews, 27 dozers, 21 water tenders, 6 helicopters, 7 air tankers and 201 overhead personnel were assigned to the incident. The impact to the residents and communities was immeasurable with 91 housing structures, 136 out buildings and 184 vehicles destroyed. A mass evacuation was begun Saturday with traffic control and check points in place on the 27th, 28th and 29th. At 10:00 am Monday affected residents were allowed re-entry.

Source: http://dohfd.com/Dobbins%20OH%20History2.html

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2004 Parkfield Quake Anniversary

When:
Saturday, 28 September 2019

Where:
Cholame Valley - Monterey/San Luis Obispo Counties

Organizer: Kim Patrick Noyes

Details:
The 6.0 magnitude primary shock in 2004 was the result of a fault movement of about 18 inches (.5 meter). There have been no indications found that could have been used to predict this earthquake. Although well overdue, the probability of this quake occurring in 2004 has been estimated at about ten percent. The magnitude of the event was consistent with previous earthquakes in this region.

Substantial aftershocks continued for more than a week after the initial event, moving in a northwesterly progression. In early October, there was a cluster of small earthquakes near Paso Robles near a parallel fault to the west. These may be in response to the transfer of stress to these faults after the release of stress at Parkfield. Past earthquakes have also occurred to the east of Parkfield at about the same distance from the San Andreas fault near Coalinga and Avenal.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parkfield_earthquake#2004_event

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[CaliforniaDisasters] Disaster Recovery

https://www.usuhs.edu/ncdmph/research-education/recovery-curriculum


Jeff Miller
KJ6RHF

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Tuesday, September 17, 2019

[CaliforniaDisasters] Sundowner Wind Advisory Till 3 AM 9/17/2019

URGENT - WEATHER MESSAGE  National Weather Service Los Angeles/Oxnard CA  712 PM PDT Mon Sep 16 2019    CAZ039-052-171000-  /O.NEW.KLOX.WI.Y.0066.190917T0212Z-190917T1000Z/  Santa Barbara County South Coast-Santa Barbara County Mountains-  Including the cities of Santa Barbara, Montecito, Carpinteria,  San Marcos Pass, San Rafael Wilderness Area,  and Dick Smith Wilderness Area  712 PM PDT Mon Sep 16 2019    ...WIND ADVISORY IN EFFECT UNTIL 3 AM PDT TUESDAY...    The National Weather Service in Los Angeles/Oxnard has issued a  Wind Advisory, which is in effect until 3 AM PDT Tuesday.    * WINDS...Northwest to north winds 20 to 30 mph with gusts between    35 and 45 mph will continue through late tonight. The strongest    winds will occur from Gaviota to Goleta.    * IMPACTS...Gusty winds will make driving difficult, especially    for high profile vehicles. This includes Highways 101 and 154,    as well as the Gaviota and San Marcos Passes.    PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS...    When driving, use extra caution. Be prepared for sudden gusty  cross winds.


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[CaliforniaDisasters] 1923 Berkeley Fire Anniversary - Tue, 09/17/2019 #cal-notice

1923 Berkeley Fire Anniversary

When:
Tuesday, 17 September 2019

Where:
Berkeley Hills - Alameda County

Description:
The 1923 Berkeley Fire was a conflagration that consumed some 640 structures, including 584 homes in the densely-built neighborhoods north of the campus of the University of California in Berkeley, California on September 17, 1923.

Although the exact cause was never determined, the fire began in the undeveloped chaparral and grasslands of Wildcat Canyon, just east of the ridgeline of the Berkeley Hills, and was propelled over the ridge and southwestward just south of Codornices Creek by a strong, gusty, and intensely dry northeasterly wind. The fire quickly blew up as it swept through the La Loma Park and Northside neighborhoods of Berkeley, overwhelming the capabilities of the Berkeley Fire Department to stop it. A number of UC students fought the advance of the fire as it approached the north edge of the University of California campus, at Hearst Avenue. The other edge of the fire was fought by firefighters as it advanced on downtown Berkeley along the east side of Shattuck Avenue north of University Avenue. Firefighters were rushed in from neighboring Oakland, and San Francisco sent firefighters by ferry across the bay.

Firefighting efforts were hampered by the inadequacy of water mains in northern Berkeley, where rapid development after the 1906 San Francisco earthquake had outgrown the water supply in the fire area. Firefighters trying to fight the fire connected to hydrants in the area that hissed dry and were hampered also by the predominance of cedar shake roofs. The strong and dry wind lifted burning shakes off burning houses and quickly spread the fire. The fire was halted only when the northeasterly winds died down and were replaced by the cool, humid afternoon sea breeze. The fire lines were established at Hearst and Shattuck Avenues, where larger diameter water mains delivered a reliable water supply for firefighting.

Building styles in North Berkeley changed dramatically after the 1923 fire, with stucco and tile roof homes largely, but not entirely, replacing the wood-sided and cedar-shaked construction styles popularized by the Berkeley Hillside Club before the fire.

As a belated result of the fire, the City of Berkeley constructed a fire station in the hills at 2931 Shasta Road (at Queens Road) just below Grizzly Peak Blvd, in 1948. In the early 2000s, this station was replaced and relocated to a nearby site just above Grizzly Peak Blvd. at 3000 Shasta Road, on the interface between the residential area and Tilden Regional Park, very close to the putative origin of the 1923 fire.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1923_Berkeley,_California_fire

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