Monday, July 11, 2016

[ Volcano ] Smithsonian / USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report 7-13 October 2015

Smithsonian / USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report 7-13 October 2015
From: "Kuhn, Sally" <>
Smithsonian / USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report
7-13 October 2015
Sally Kuhn Sennert - Weekly Report Editor (
New Activity/Unrest: Alaid, Kuril Islands (Russia)  | Copahue, Central Chile-Argentina border  | Fuego, Guatemala  | Veniaminof, United States
Ongoing Activity: Barren Island, Andaman Islands (India)  | Batu Tara, Komba Island (Indonesia)  | Cleveland, Chuginadak Island (USA)  | Cotopaxi, Ecuador  | Dukono, Halmahera (Indonesia)  | Karangetang, Siau Island (Indonesia)  | Karymsky, Eastern Kamchatka (Russia)  | Kilauea, Hawaiian Islands (USA)  | Lewotobi, Flores Island (Indonesia)  | Manam, Papua New Guinea  | Nevado del Ruiz, Colombia  | Piton de la Fournaise, Reunion Island (France)  | Sheveluch, Central Kamchatka (Russia)  | Shishaldin, Fox Islands (USA)  | Sinabung, Indonesia  | Tungurahua, Ecuador
The Weekly Volcanic Activity Report is a cooperative project between the Smithsonian's Global Volcanism Program and the US Geological Survey's Volcano Hazards Program. Updated by 2300 UTC every Wednesday, notices of volcanic activity posted on these pages are preliminary and subject to change as events are studied in more detail. This is not a comprehensive list of all of Earth's volcanoes erupting during the week, but rather a summary of activity at volcanoes that meet criteria discussed in detail in the "Criteria and Disclaimers" section. Carefully reviewed, detailed reports on various volcanoes are published monthly in the Bulletin of the Global Volcanism Network.
Note: Many news agencies do not archive the articles they post on the Internet, and therefore the links to some sources may not be active. To obtain information about the cited articles that are no longer available on the Internet contact the source.
New Activity/Unrest
Alaid  | Kuril Islands (Russia)  | 50.861°N, 155.565°E  | Summit elev. 2285 m
KVERT reported that moderate activity at Alaid continued during 2-9 October. A thermal anomaly was detected daily over the volcano. The Aviation Color Code remained at Yellow.
Geologic Summary. The highest and northernmost volcano of the Kuril Islands, 2285-m-high Alaid is a symmetrical stratovolcano when viewed from the north, but has a 1.5-km-wide summit crater that is breached widely to the south. Alaid is the northernmost of a chain of volcanoes constructed west of the main Kuril archipelago and rises 3000 m from the floor of the Sea of Okhotsk. Numerous pyroclastic cones dot the lower flanks of basaltic to basaltic-andesite Alaid volcano, particularly on the NW and SE sides, including an offshore cone formed during the 1933-34 eruption. Strong explosive eruptions have occurred from the summit crater beginning in the 18th century. Reports of eruptions in 1770, 1789, 1821, 1829, 1843, 1848, and 1858 were considered incorrect by Gorshkov (1970). Explosive eruptions in 1790 and 1981 were among the largest in the Kuril Islands during historical time.
Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)
Copahue  | Central Chile-Argentina border  | 37.856°S, 71.183°W  | Summit elev. 2953 m
According to the Buenos Aires VAAC, a pilot observed a gray plume rising from Copahue to altitudes of 6.1-7.6 km (20,000-25,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifting NE on 11 October. Satellite images indicated no ash; the webcam recorded continuous emissions of water vapor and gas, and low-levels of ash. The next day the webcam recorded weak steam-and-gas emissions possibly with minor amounts of ash drifting SE.
Geologic Summary. Volcán Copahue is an elongated composite cone constructed along the Chile-Argentina border within the 6.5 x 8.5 km wide Trapa-Trapa caldera that formed between 0.6 and 0.4 million years ago near the NW margin of the 20 x 15 km Pliocene Caviahue (Del Agrio) caldera. The eastern summit crater, part of a 2-km-long, ENE-WSW line of nine craters, contains a briny, acidic 300-m-wide crater lake (also referred to as El Agrio or Del Agrio) and displays intense fumarolic activity. Acidic hot springs occur below the eastern outlet of the crater lake, contributing to the acidity of the Río Agrio, and another geothermal zone is located within Caviahue caldera about 7 km NE of the summit. Infrequent mild-to-moderate explosive eruptions have been recorded at Copahue since the 18th century. Twentieth-century eruptions from the crater lake have ejected pyroclastic rocks and chilled liquid sulfur fragments.
Source: Buenos Aires Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)
Fuego  | Guatemala  | 14.473°N, 90.88°W  | Summit elev. 3763 m
INSIVUMEH reported that by 8 October the lava flows on Fuego's flanks were 800 m and 1.5 km long, and advancing into the Santa Teresa (W) and Trinidad (S) drainages, respectively. Ash plumes from explosions rose 750 m above the crater and drifted 12 km W and SW. Ashfall was reported in Morelia, Sangre de Cristo, Panimache, and Santa Sofía. On 10 October at 2100 activity became constant; incandescent material was ejected 200 m high. Strombolian activity during 12-13 October continued to feed lava flows on the flanks; flows had advanced to 1 and 1.3 km away from the crater in the Santa Teresa and Trinidad drainages, respectively. Explosions, some producing shock waves, continued to generate ash plumes that rose as high as 750 m above the crater and drifted 12 km SW. Ashfall was again reported in Morelia, Sangre de Cristo, Panimache, and Santa Sofía.
Geologic Summary. Volcán Fuego, one of Central America's most active volcanoes, is one of three large stratovolcanoes overlooking Guatemala's former capital, Antigua. The scarp of an older edifice, Meseta, lies between 3763-m-high Fuego and its twin volcano to the north, Acatenango. Construction of Meseta dates back to about 230,000 years and continued until the late Pleistocene or early Holocene. Collapse of Meseta may have produced the massive Escuintla debris-avalanche deposit, which extends about 50 km onto the Pacific coastal plain. Growth of the modern Fuego volcano followed, continuing the southward migration of volcanism that began at Acatenango. In contrast to the mostly andesitic Acatenango, eruptions at Fuego have become more mafic with time, and most historical activity has produced basaltic rocks. Frequent vigorous historical eruptions have been recorded since the onset of the Spanish era in 1524, and have produced major ashfalls, along with occasional pyroclastic flows and lava flows.
Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)
Veniaminof  | United States  | 56.17°N, 159.38°W  | Summit elev. 2507 m
AVO reported that slightly elevated levels of seismicity continued to be detected at Veniaminof during 7-13 October. Minor steam emissions were recorded by the webcam on 7 October. The Aviation Color Code remained at Yellow and the Volcano Alert Level remained at Advisory.
Geologic Summary. Massive Veniaminof volcano, one of the highest and largest volcanoes on the Alaska Peninsula, is truncated by a steep-walled, 8 x 11 km, glacier-filled caldera that formed around 3700 years ago. The caldera rim is up to 520 m high on the north, is deeply notched on the west by Cone Glacier, and is covered by an ice sheet on the south. Post-caldera vents are located along a NW-SE zone bisecting the caldera that extends 55 km from near the Bering Sea coast, across the caldera, and down the Pacific flank. Historical eruptions probably all originated from the westernmost and most prominent of two intra-caldera cones, which reaches an elevation of 2156 m and rises about 300 m above the surrounding icefield. The other cone is larger, and has a summit crater or caldera that may reach 2.5 km in diameter, but is more subdued and barely rises above the glacier surface.
Source: US Geological Survey Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO)
Ongoing Activity
Barren Island  | Andaman Islands (India)  | 12.278°N, 93.858°E  | Summit elev. 354 m
Based on analysis of satellite imagery and wind data, the Darwin VAAC reported that during 8-9 October ash plumes from Barren Island rose to altitudes of 1.5-2.1 km (5,000-7,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 75-100 km NE.
Geologic Summary. Barren Island, a possession of India in the Andaman Sea about 135 km NE of Port Blair in the Andaman Islands, is the only historically active volcano along the N-S-trending volcanic arc extending between Sumatra and Burma (Myanmar). The 354-m-high island is the emergent summit of a volcano that rises from a depth of about 2250 m. The small, uninhabited 3-km-wide island contains a roughly 2-km-wide caldera with walls 250-350 m high. The caldera, which is open to the sea on the west, was created during a major explosive eruption in the late Pleistocene that produced pyroclastic-flow and -surge deposits. Historical eruptions have changed the morphology of the pyroclastic cone in the center of the caldera, and lava flows that fill much of the caldera floor have reached the sea along the western coast.
Sources: Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC);
Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC)
Batu Tara  | Komba Island (Indonesia)  | 7.792°S, 123.579°E  | Summit elev. 748 m
Based on analysis of satellite imagery and wind data, the Darwin VAAC reported that during 7-8 and 13 October ash plumes from Batu Tara rose to altitudes of 1.5-2.1 km (5,000-7,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 90-100 km NW and W.
Geologic Summary. The small isolated island of Batu Tara in the Flores Sea about 50 km N of Lembata (fomerly Lomblen) Island contains a scarp on the eastern side similar to the Sciara del Fuoco of Italy's Stromboli volcano. Vegetation covers the flanks to within 50 m of the 748-m-high summit. Batu Tara lies north of the main volcanic arc and is noted for its potassic leucite-bearing basanitic and tephritic rocks. The first historical eruption, during 1847-52, produced explosions and a lava flow.
Source: Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC)
Cleveland  | Chuginadak Island (USA)  | 52.825°N, 169.944°W  | Summit elev. 1730 m
AVO reported that during 7-13 October no activity at Cleveland was detected in satellite and webcam images. No significant activity was detected in seismic or infrasound data. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange and the Volcano Alert Level remained at Watch.
Geologic Summary. Beautifully symmetrical Mount Cleveland stratovolcano is situated at the western end of the uninhabited, dumbbell-shaped Chuginadak Island. It lies SE across Carlisle Pass strait from Carlisle volcano and NE across Chuginadak Pass strait from Herbert volcano. Cleveland is joined to the rest of Chuginadak Island by a low isthmus. The 1730-m-high Mount Cleveland is the highest of the Islands of the Four Mountains group and is one of the most active of the Aleutian Islands. The native name for Mount Cleveland, Chuginadak, refers to the Aleut goddess of fire, who was thought to reside on the volcano. Numerous large lava flows descend the steep-sided flanks. It is possible that some 18th-to-19th century eruptions attributed to Carlisle should be ascribed to Cleveland (Miller et al., 1998). In 1944 Cleveland produced the only known fatality from an Aleutian eruption. Recent eruptions have been characterized by short-lived explosive ash emissions, at times accompanied by lava fountaining and lava flows down the flanks.
Source: US Geological Survey Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO)
Cotopaxi  | Ecuador  | 0.677°S, 78.436°W  | Summit elev. 5911 m
IG reported that during 7-13 October gas, steam, and ash plumes rose from Cotopaxi as high as 2.5 km above the crater and drifted NW, W, and SW. Ash fell on the N flank on 7 October. Ashfall was also reported in El Chasqui Chaupi, Machachi (24 km NW), Aloag (28 km NW), and Obelisco on 8 October, and in San Ramón, San Agustín, San Isidro (58 km N), Rumipamba de Espinosas (53 km NNW), Callo Mancheno, Santa Catalina (52 km N), and San Francisco on 13 October.
Geologic Summary. Symmetrical, glacier-clad Cotopaxi stratovolcano is Ecuador's most well-known volcano and one of its most active. The steep-sided cone is capped by nested summit craters, the largest of which is about 550 x 800 m in diameter. Deep valleys scoured by lahars radiate from the summit of the andesitic volcano, and large andesitic lava flows extend as far as the base of Cotopaxi. The modern conical volcano has been constructed since a major edifice collapse sometime prior to about 5000 years ago. Pyroclastic flows (often confused in historical accounts with lava flows) have accompanied many explosive eruptions of Cotopaxi, and lahars have frequently devastated adjacent valleys. The most violent historical eruptions took place in 1744, 1768, and 1877. Pyroclastic flows descended all sides of the volcano in 1877, and lahars traveled more than 100 km into the Pacific Ocean and western Amazon basin. The last significant eruption of Cotopaxi took place in 1904.
Source: Instituto Geofísico-Escuela Politécnica Nacional (IG)
Dukono  | Halmahera (Indonesia)  | 1.68°N, 127.88°E  | Summit elev. 1335 m
Based on analyses of satellite imagery and wind data, the Darwin VAAC reported that during 7-13 October ash plumes from Dukono rose to an altitude of 2.1 km (7,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 45-175 km E and NE.
Geologic Summary. Reports from this remote volcano in northernmost Halmahera are rare, but Dukono has been one of Indonesia's most active volcanoes. More-or-less continuous explosive eruptions, sometimes accompanied by lava flows, occurred from 1933 until at least the mid-1990s, when routine observations were curtailed. During a major eruption in 1550, a lava flow filled in the strait between Halmahera and the north-flank cone of Gunung Mamuya. This complex volcano presents a broad, low profile with multiple summit peaks and overlapping craters. Malupang Wariang, 1 km SW of the summit crater complex, contains a 700 x 570 m crater that has also been active during historical time.
Source: Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC)
Karangetang  | Siau Island (Indonesia)  | 2.78°N, 125.4°E  | Summit elev. 1784 m
Based on observations conducted at the Karangetang Volcano Observation Post in the village of Salili, PVMBG reported during 30 September-7 October that lava flows traveled as far as 200 m S. Incandescent avalanches from the fronts of lava flows traveled as far as 2 km E down the Batuawang and Kahetang drainages, and 1 km down the Batang (S) drainage. Seismicity decreased, but continued to be dominated by signals characteristic of avalanches. Harmonic tremor was also detected. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4); visitors and residents were warned not to approach Karangetang within a 4-km radius. Based on analyses of satellite imagery and wind data, the Darwin VAAC reported that on 8 October an ash plume rose to an altitude of 2.7 km (7,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 65 km E.
Geologic Summary. Karangetang (Api Siau) volcano lies at the northern end of the island of Siau, north of Sulawesi. The 1784-m-high stratovolcano contains five summit craters along a N-S line. Karangetang is one of Indonesia's most active volcanoes, with more than 40 eruptions recorded since 1675 and many additional small eruptions that were not documented in the historical record (Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World: Neumann van Padang, 1951). Twentieth-century eruptions have included frequent explosive activity sometimes accompanied by pyroclastic flows and lahars. Lava dome growth has occurred in the summit craters; collapse of lava flow fronts has also produced pyroclastic flows.
Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)
Karymsky  | Eastern Kamchatka (Russia)  | 54.049°N, 159.443°E  | Summit elev. 1513 m
KVERT reported that moderate explosive activity at Karymsky continued during 2-9 October. Satellite images showed a thermal anomaly over the volcano on 4 and 8 October, and an ash plume that drifted 50 km SE on 8 October. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.
Geologic Summary. Karymsky, the most active volcano of Kamchatka's eastern volcanic zone, is a symmetrical stratovolcano constructed within a 5-km-wide caldera that formed during the early Holocene. The caldera cuts the south side of the Pleistocene Dvor volcano and is located outside the north margin of the large mid-Pleistocene Polovinka caldera, which contains the smaller Akademia Nauk and Odnoboky calderas. Most seismicity preceding Karymsky eruptions originated beneath Akademia Nauk caldera, located immediately south. The caldera enclosing Karymsky formed about 7600-7700 radiocarbon years ago; construction of the stratovolcano began about 2000 years later. The latest eruptive period began about 500 years ago, following a 2300-year quiescence. Much of the cone is mantled by lava flows less than 200 years old. Historical eruptions have been vulcanian or vulcanian-strombolian with moderate explosive activity and occasional lava flows from the summit crater.
Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)
Kilauea  | Hawaiian Islands (USA)  | 19.421°N, 155.287°W  | Summit elev. 1222 m
HVO reported that seismicity beneath Kilauea's summit, upper East Rift Zone, and Southwest Rift Zone was at background levels during 7-13 October. The lava lake continued to circulate and spatter in the Overlook vent. The June 27th NE-trending lava flow continued to be active within 3-7 km NE of Pu'u 'O'o Crater.
Geologic Summary. Kilauea volcano, which overlaps the east flank of the massive Mauna Loa shield volcano, has been Hawaii's most active volcano during historical time. Eruptions of Kilauea are prominent in Polynesian legends; written documentation extending back to only 1820 records frequent summit and flank lava flow eruptions that were interspersed with periods of long-term lava lake activity that lasted until 1924 at Halemaumau crater, within the summit caldera. The 3 x 5 km caldera was formed in several stages about 1500 years ago and during the 18th century; eruptions have also originated from the lengthy East and SW rift zones, which extend to the sea on both sides of the volcano. About 90% of the surface of the basaltic shield volcano is formed of lava flows less than about 1100 years old; 70% of the volcano's surface is younger than 600 years. A long-term eruption from the East rift zone that began in 1983 has produced lava flows covering more than 100 sq km, destroying nearly 200 houses and adding new coastline to the island.
Source: US Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO)
Lewotobi  | Flores Island (Indonesia)  | 8.542°S, 122.775°E  | Summit elev. 1703 m
PVMBG reported that white plumes were observed rising 15 m above Lewotobi during periods of clear weather from 1 Septmber-6 October. Seismicity declined significantly during the previous three months and became stable. The Alert Level was lowered to 1 (on a scale of 1-4) on 7 October.
Geologic Summary. The Lewotobi "husband and wife" twin volcano (also known as Lewetobi) in eastern Flores Island is composed of the Lewotobi Lakilaki and Lewotobi Perempuan stratovolcanoes. Their summits are less than 2 km apart along a NW-SE line. The conical 1584-m-high Lewotobi Lakilaki has been frequently active during the 19th and 20th centuries, while the taller and broader 1703-m-high Lewotobi Perempuan has erupted only twice in historical time. Small lava domes have grown during the 20th century in the crescentic summit craters of both volcanoes, which are open to the north. A prominent flank cone, Iliwokar, occurs on the E flank of Lewotobi Perampuan.
Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)
Manam  | Papua New Guinea  | 4.08°S, 145.037°E  | Summit elev. 1807 m
Based on observations of satellite imagery and wind data analyses, the Darwin VAAC reported that on 8 October ash plumes from Manam rose to an altitude of 1.8 km (6,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted almost 50 km NW.
Geologic Summary. The 10-km-wide island of Manam, lying 13 km off the northern coast of mainland Papua New Guinea, is one of the country's most active volcanoes. Four large radial valleys extend from the unvegetated summit of the conical 1807-m-high basaltic-andesitic stratovolcano to its lower flanks. These "avalanche valleys" channel lava flows and pyroclastic avalanches that have sometimes reached the coast. Five small satellitic centers are located near the island's shoreline on the northern, southern, and western sides. Two summit craters are present; both are active, although most historical eruptions have originated from the southern crater, concentrating eruptive products during much of the past century into the SE valley. Frequent historical eruptions, typically of mild-to-moderate scale, have been recorded since 1616. Occasional larger eruptions have produced pyroclastic flows and lava flows that reached flat-lying coastal areas and entered the sea, sometimes impacting populated areas.
Source: Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC)
Nevado del Ruiz  | Colombia  | 4.892°N, 75.324°W  | Summit elev. 5279 m
Servicio Geológico Colombiano's (SGC) Observatorio Vulcanológico y Sismológico de Manizales reported that during 6-12 October seismicity at Nevado del Ruiz was characterized by long-period earthquakes and short-duration volcanic tremor associated with gas-and-ash emissions. Earthquakes occurred at depths between 1.4 and 8.2 km. The largest event was recorded at 0802 on 11 October, with a local M 3.4, near Arenas Crater at a depth of 3.6 km. That event was felt by residents and corresponded to a seismic increase at the NE part of Arenas Crater. Thermal anomalies over the crater were detected in satellite images during 7 and 9-10 October. Significant amounts of water vapor and gas rose from the crater during the week. A gas, steam, and ash plume rose 1.7 km and drifted NW on 8 October. The Alert Level remained at III (Yellow; "changes in the behavior of volcanic activity").
Geologic Summary. Nevado del Ruiz is a broad, glacier-covered volcano in central Colombia that covers >200 sq km. Three major edifices, composed of andesitic and dacitic lavas and andesitic pyroclastics, have been constructed since the beginning of the Pleistocene. The modern cone consists of a broad cluster of lava domes built within the caldera of an older edifice. The 1-km-wide, 240-m-deep Arenas crater occupies the summit. The prominent La Olleta pyroclastic cone located on the SW flank may also have been active in historical time. Steep headwalls of massive landslides cut the flanks. Melting of its summit icecap during historical eruptions, which date back to the 16th century, has resulted in devastating lahars, including one in 1985 that was South America's deadliest eruption.
Source: Servicio Geológico Colombiano (SGC)
Piton de la Fournaise  | Reunion Island (France)  | 21.244°S, 55.708°E  | Summit elev. 2632 m
OVPDLF reported that seismicity at Piton de la Fournaise continued to slowly increase during 1-9 October, and deformation data showed a trend of deflation since 27 September. Inclement weather inhibited gas flow measurements; the few measurements taken showed continued sulfur dioxide emissions and a significant increase in water vapor emissions. During 6-9 October the lava lake remained active; bursting gas bubbles ejected lava onto the edges of the 30-35-m-high cone. Pahoehoe lava flows issued from ephemeral vents on lava tubes, and in many instances hornitos were present at these vents. Lava was active as far as 2.5 km from the base of the cone and burned vegetation near the base of Piton de Bert. The lava-flow rate peaked at 11 m³/s during 1-4 October then returned to the previous rate of 5-10 m³/s. On 7 October lava flowed out of a breach in the cone.
Geologic Summary. The massive Piton de la Fournaise basaltic shield volcano on the French island of Réunion in the western Indian Ocean is one of the world's most active volcanoes. Much of its more than 530,000-year history overlapped with eruptions of the deeply dissected Piton des Neiges shield volcano to the NW. Three calderas formed at about 250,000, 65,000, and less than 5000 years ago by progressive eastward slumping of the volcano. Numerous pyroclastic cones dot the floor of the calderas and their outer flanks. Most historical eruptions have originated from the summit and flanks of Dolomieu, a 400-m-high lava shield that has grown within the youngest caldera, which is 8 km wide and breached to below sea level on the eastern side. More than 150 eruptions, most of which have produced fluid basaltic lava flows, have occurred since the 17th century. Only six eruptions, in 1708, 1774, 1776, 1800, 1977, and 1986, have originated from fissures on the outer flanks of the caldera. The Piton de la Fournaise Volcano Observatory, one of several operated by the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, monitors this very active volcano.
Source: Observatoire Volcanologique du Piton de la Fournaise (OVPDLF)
Sheveluch  | Central Kamchatka (Russia)  | 56.653°N, 161.36°E  | Summit elev. 3283 m
KVERT reported that during 2-9 October lava-dome extrusion onto Sheveluch's N flank was accompanied by fumarolic activity, dome incandescence, and hot avalanches. Satellite images detected a daily thermal anomaly over the dome. Explosions and hot avalanches occurring during 2 and 7-8 October generated ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 2.5-5.5 km (8,200-18,000 km) a.s.l. and drifted 400 km SE. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.
Geologic Summary. The high, isolated massif of Sheveluch volcano (also spelled Shiveluch) rises above the lowlands NNE of the Kliuchevskaya volcano group. The 1300 cu km volcano is one of Kamchatka's largest and most active volcanic structures. The summit of roughly 65,000-year-old Stary Shiveluch is truncated by a broad 9-km-wide late-Pleistocene caldera breached to the south. Many lava domes dot its outer flanks. The Molodoy Shiveluch lava dome complex was constructed during the Holocene within the large horseshoe-shaped caldera; Holocene lava dome extrusion also took place on the flanks of Stary Shiveluch. At least 60 large eruptions have occurred during the Holocene, making it the most vigorous andesitic volcano of the Kuril-Kamchatka arc. Widespread tephra layers from these eruptions have provided valuable time markers for dating volcanic events in Kamchatka. Frequent collapses of dome complexes, most recently in 1964, have produced debris avalanches whose deposits cover much of the floor of the breached caldera.
Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)
Shishaldin  | Fox Islands (USA)  | 54.756°N, 163.97°W  | Summit elev. 2857 m
AVO reported that seismicity at Shishaldin continued to be elevated over background levels during 7-13 October, indicating that low-level eruptive activity confined to the summit crater continued. Cloud cover often prevented satellite and webcam observations; minor steam emissions were visible on 7 October, and weakly elevated surface temperatures were detected in satellite images during 7-8 October. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange and the Volcano Alert Level remained at Watch.
Geologic Summary. The beautifully symmetrical volcano of Shishaldin is the highest and one of the most active volcanoes of the Aleutian Islands. The 2857-m-high, glacier-covered volcano is the westernmost of three large stratovolcanoes along an E-W line in the eastern half of Unimak Island. The Aleuts named the volcano Sisquk, meaning "mountain which points the way when I am lost." A steady steam plume rises from its small summit crater. Constructed atop an older glacially dissected volcano, it is Holocene in age and largely basaltic in composition. Remnants of an older ancestral volcano are exposed on the west and NE sides at 1500-1800 m elevation. There are over two dozen pyroclastic cones on its NW flank, which is blanketed by massive aa lava flows. Frequent explosive activity, primarily consisting of strombolian ash eruptions from the small summit crater, but sometimes producing lava flows, has been recorded since the 18th century.
Source: US Geological Survey Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO)
Sinabung  | Indonesia  | 3.17°N, 98.392°E  | Summit elev. 2460 m
PVMBG reported that during 28 September-7 October inclement weather sometimes prevented visual observations of Sinabung and the growing lava dome in the summit crater. Lava flows on the flanks were incandescent as far as 2 km E to SE. As many as three pyroclastic flows per day were detected, traveling as far as 3 km ESE. Ash plumes rose as high as 2.5 km. Seismicity consisted of avalanche signals, low-frequency and hybrid events, tremor, tectonic events, and volcanic earthquakes. Seismicity fluctuated at high levels, although it had declined compared to the previous week. The Alert Level remained at 4 (on a scale of 1-4), indicating that people within 7 km of the volcano on the SSE sector, and within 6 km in the ESE sector, should evacuate.
Geologic Summary. Gunung Sinabung is a Pleistocene-to-Holocene stratovolcano with many lava flows on its flanks. The migration of summit vents along a N-S line gives the summit crater complex an elongated form. The youngest crater of this conical, 2460-m-high andesitic-to-dacitic volcano is at the southern end of the four overlapping summit craters. An unconfirmed eruption was noted in 1881, and solfataric activity was seen at the summit and upper flanks in 1912. No confirmed historical eruptions were recorded prior to explosive eruptions during August-September 2010 that produced ash plumes to 5 km above the summit.
Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)
Tungurahua  | Ecuador  | 1.467°S, 78.442°W  | Summit elev. 5023 m
IG reported moderate-to-high seismic activity at Tungurahua during 7-13 October, characterized by long-period events, volcano-tectonic events, explosions, and signals indicating emissions. Cloud cover often prevented visual observations; steam-and-gas plumes were observed on a few days. Tremor began to be detected at 1340 on 11 October, and was accompanied by a gas-and-ash plume that rose 2 km above the crater. At 1906 incandescent blocks ejected from the crater rolled 500 m down the W flank. Later that night roaring, explosions, and falling blocks were heard, and structures in nearby towns vibrated. Ashfall was reported in Manzanó (8 km SW), Choglontus (13 km WSW), Pillate (8 km W), and Mocha (25 km W). Two small explosions took place on 12 October, ejecting blocks that rolled down the Cusúa (NW), Juive (NW), and Runtun drainages.
Geologic Summary. Tungurahua, a steep-sided andesitic-dacitic stratovolcano that towers more than 3 km above its northern base, is one of Ecuador's most active volcanoes. Three major edifices have been sequentially constructed since the mid-Pleistocene over a basement of metamorphic rocks. Tungurahua II was built within the past 14,000 years following the collapse of the initial edifice. Tungurahua II itself collapsed about 3000 years ago and produced a large debris-avalanche deposit and a horseshoe-shaped caldera open to the west, inside which the modern glacier-capped stratovolcano (Tungurahua III) was constructed. Historical eruptions have all originated from the summit crater, accompanied by strong explosions and sometimes by pyroclastic flows and lava flows that reached populated areas at the volcano's base. Prior to a long-term eruption beginning in 1999 that caused the temporary evacuation of the city of Baños at the foot of the volcano, the last major eruption had occurred from 1916 to 1918, although minor activity continued until 1925.
Source: Instituto Geofísico-Escuela Politécnica Nacional (IG)


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