Monday, July 11, 2016

[ Volcano ] Smithsonian / USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report 2-8 September 2015

Smithsonian / USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report 2-8 September 2015
From: "Kuhn, Sally" <>
Smithsonian / USGS Weekly Volcanic Activity Report
2-8 September 2015
Sally Kuhn Sennert - Weekly Report Editor (
New Activity/Unrest: Aira, Kyushu (Japan)  | Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge  | Cotopaxi, Ecuador  | Nevado del Ruiz, Colombia  | Piton de la Fournaise, Reunion Island (France)
Ongoing Activity: Asosan, Kyushu (Japan)  | Cleveland, Chuginadak Island (USA)  | Colima, Mexico  | Dukono, Halmahera (Indonesia)  | Fuego, Guatemala  | Gamalama, Halmahera (Indonesia)  | Karymsky, Eastern Kamchatka (Russia)  | Kilauea, Hawaiian Islands (USA)  | Manam, Papua New Guinea  | Santa Maria, Guatemala  | Sheveluch, Central Kamchatka (Russia)  | Shishaldin, Fox Islands (USA)  | Sinabung, Indonesia  | Tungurahua, Ecuador  | Ubinas, Peru
The Weekly Volcanic Activity Report is a cooperative project between the Smithsonian's Global Volcanism Program and the US Geological Survey's Volcano Hazards Program. Updated by 2300 UTC every Wednesday, notices of volcanic activity posted on these pages are preliminary and subject to change as events are studied in more detail. This is not a comprehensive list of all of Earth's volcanoes erupting during the week, but rather a summary of activity at volcanoes that meet criteria discussed in detail in the "Criteria and Disclaimers" section. Carefully reviewed, detailed reports on various volcanoes are published monthly in the Bulletin of the Global Volcanism Network.
Note: Many news agencies do not archive the articles they post on the Internet, and therefore the links to some sources may not be active. To obtain information about the cited articles that are no longer available on the Internet contact the source.
New Activity/Unrest
Aira  | Kyushu (Japan)  | 31.593°N, 130.657°E  | Summit elev. 1117 m
JMA reported 30 explosions during 31 August-7 September from Showa Crater at Aira Caldera's Sakurajima volcano, some that ejected tephra as far as 1,300 m, and incandescence from the crater that was occasionally visible at night. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a 5-level scale).
Geologic Summary. The Aira caldera in the northern half of Kagoshima Bay contains the post-caldera Sakurajima volcano, one of Japan's most active. Eruption of the voluminous Ito pyroclastic flow accompanied formation of the 17 x 23 km caldera about 22,000 years ago. The smaller Wakamiko caldera was formed during the early Holocene in the NE corner of the Aira caldera, along with several post-caldera cones. The construction of Sakurajima began about 13,000 years ago on the southern rim of Aira caldera and built an island that was finally joined to the Osumi Peninsula during the major explosive and effusive eruption of 1914. Activity at the Kitadake summit cone ended about 4850 years ago, after which eruptions took place at Minamidake. Frequent historical eruptions, recorded since the 8th century, have deposited ash on Kagoshima, one of Kyushu's largest cities, located across Kagoshima Bay only 8 km from the summit. The largest historical eruption took place during 1471-76.
Source: Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA)
Axial Seamount  | Juan de Fuca Ridge  | 45.95°N, 130°W  | Summit elev. -1410 m
An eruption at Axial Seamount, inferred to have started at 2230 on 23 April with an earthquake swarm, was confirmed during 14-29 August by bathymetric data and observations made during a ROV Jason dive. Two large lava flows from the N rift zone (8-16 km N of the summit caldera) were at most 127 m thick; some of the thicker areas had drained collapse features indicating they had molten interiors when emplaced. The ROV traversed the flows for about 2 km. New, thinner lava flows were also identified in the NE summit caldera and on the NE rim.
Geologic Summary. Axial Seamount rises 700 m above the mean level of the central Juan de Fuca Ridge crest about 480 km W of Cannon Beach, Oregon, to within about 1400 m of the sea surface. It is the most magmatically robust and seismically active site on the Juan de Fuca Ridge between the Blanco Fracture Zone and the Cobb offset. The summit is marked by an unusual rectangular-shaped caldera (3 x 8 km) that lies between two rift zones and is estimated to have formed about 31,000 years ago. The caldera is breached to the SE and is defined on three sides by boundary faults of up to 150 m relief. Hydrothermal vents with biological communities are located near the caldera fault and along the rift zones. Hydrothermal venting was discovered north of the caldera in 1983. Detailed mapping and sampling efforts have identified more than 50 lava flows emplaced since about 410 CE (Clague et al., 2013). Eruptions producing fissure-fed lava flows that buried previously installed seafloor instrumentation were detected seismically and geodetically in 1998 and 2011, and confirmed shortly after each eruption during submersible dives.
Source: Oregon State University's Marine Science Center and NOAA/PMEL EOI Program
Cotopaxi  | Ecuador  | 0.677°S, 78.436°W  | Summit elev. 5911 m
IG reported that during the morning on 2 September gas-and-steam plumes from Cotopaxi contained minor amounts of ash, rose 100 m above the crater, and drifted W and NW. At about 1318, plumes with moderate amounts of ash rose 4 km and drifted W. Ashfall was reported in Machachi, Aloasí, and Chaupi. Analysis of ash collected on 2 September showed that the greatest contribution of material was pre-existing and altered rock. On 3 September ash-and-water-vapor plumes rose 2.2 km and drifted N and NW. During an overflight scientists observed ash emissions that rose 1 km and drifted W then N; the plume continued to rise to 8.5 km as it drifted N. Several new cracks in the glaciers were noted, especially on the E and NE flanks. Blocks had been deposited on the N and S parts of the crater. The circular glacier at the top of the inside part of the crater had significantly decreased in size and had large fractures. Glacial melting on the upper flanks had also accelerated. Streams of meltwater were present on the N flank. Thermal images revealed temperature increases in the S and E parts of the crater and a significant increase in temperatures of emissions (200 degrees Celsius). Seismic amplitudes did not increase but signals 3-11 km deep aligned with the conduit suggested rising magma. Bright areas at the summit were observed at night, possibly from hot block deposits. During 4-8 September gas-and-ash plumes rose 1 km at most and drifted N and NW.
Geologic Summary. Symmetrical, glacier-clad Cotopaxi stratovolcano is Ecuador's most well-known volcano and one of its most active. The steep-sided cone is capped by nested summit craters, the largest of which is about 550 x 800 m in diameter. Deep valleys scoured by lahars radiate from the summit of the andesitic volcano, and large andesitic lava flows extend as far as the base of Cotopaxi. The modern conical volcano has been constructed since a major edifice collapse sometime prior to about 5000 years ago. Pyroclastic flows (often confused in historical accounts with lava flows) have accompanied many explosive eruptions of Cotopaxi, and lahars have frequently devastated adjacent valleys. The most violent historical eruptions took place in 1744, 1768, and 1877. Pyroclastic flows descended all sides of the volcano in 1877, and lahars traveled more than 100 km into the Pacific Ocean and western Amazon basin. The last significant eruption of Cotopaxi took place in 1904.
Source: Instituto Geofísico-Escuela Politécnica Nacional (IG)
Nevado del Ruiz  | Colombia  | 4.892°N, 75.324°W  | Summit elev. 5279 m
Servicio Geológico Colombiano's (SGC) Observatorio Vulcanológico and Sismológico de Manizales reported that during 1-7 September seismicity at Nevado del Ruiz was characterized by long-period earthquakes and short-duration volcanic tremor associated with gas-and-ash emissions. In addition, volcano-tectonic (VT) events occurred at depths between 0.4 and 6.4 km. The largest VT event was recorded at 0017 on 2 September, was a local M 1.4, and was 1.5 km NE of Arenas Crater at a depth of 3.8 km. Incandescence was recorded by a webcam installed near the volcano. Water-vapor-and-gas plumes rose 1.4 km above the crater and drifted NW, and were sometimes tinged gray due to the presence of ash. Ashfall was reported in Manizales (30 km NW) and Pereira (40 km WSW). The Alert Level remained at III (Yellow; "changes in the behavior of volcanic activity").
Geologic Summary. Nevado del Ruiz is a broad, glacier-covered volcano in central Colombia that covers >200 sq km. Three major edifices, composed of andesitic and dacitic lavas and andesitic pyroclastics, have been constructed since the beginning of the Pleistocene. The modern cone consists of a broad cluster of lava domes built within the caldera of an older edifice. The 1-km-wide, 240-m-deep Arenas crater occupies the summit. The prominent La Olleta pyroclastic cone located on the SW flank may also have been active in historical time. Steep headwalls of massive landslides cut the flanks. Melting of its summit icecap during historical eruptions, which date back to the 16th century, has resulted in devastating lahars, including one in 1985 that was South America's deadliest eruption.
Sources: Servicio Geológico Colombiano (SGC);
La Patria
Piton de la Fournaise  | Reunion Island (France)  | 21.244°S, 55.708°E  | Summit elev. 2632 m
OVPDLF reported that scientists conducting fieldwork at Piton de la Fournaise during 31 August-1 September observed one active cone (20 m high) filled with a lava lake. Fluctuating lava fountains rose 15-20 m above the lake surface and gas bubbles exploded. Lava traveled through a 50-m-long lava channel and was a total of 1 km long. During 1-2 September seismicity increased, and the lava flow length increased to 2 km. Tremor remained high on 5 September. The lava lake was in two separate but side-by-side vents and lava fountains were lower compared to recent days. Five small lava flows were near the foot of the cone; four were 30 m long and the fifth was 1 km long. Tremor levels started to decline on 7 September but remained at a high level through 9 September.
Geologic Summary. The massive Piton de la Fournaise basaltic shield volcano on the French island of Réunion in the western Indian Ocean is one of the world's most active volcanoes. Much of its more than 530,000-year history overlapped with eruptions of the deeply dissected Piton des Neiges shield volcano to the NW. Three calderas formed at about 250,000, 65,000, and less than 5000 years ago by progressive eastward slumping of the volcano. Numerous pyroclastic cones dot the floor of the calderas and their outer flanks. Most historical eruptions have originated from the summit and flanks of Dolomieu, a 400-m-high lava shield that has grown within the youngest caldera, which is 8 km wide and breached to below sea level on the eastern side. More than 150 eruptions, most of which have produced fluid basaltic lava flows, have occurred since the 17th century. Only six eruptions, in 1708, 1774, 1776, 1800, 1977, and 1986, have originated from fissures on the outer flanks of the caldera. The Piton de la Fournaise Volcano Observatory, one of several operated by the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris, monitors this very active volcano.
Source: Observatoire Volcanologique du Piton de la Fournaise (OVPDLF)
Ongoing Activity
Asosan  | Kyushu (Japan)  | 32.884°N, 131.104°E  | Summit elev. 1592 m
JMA reported that on 3 September a small-scale eruption from Asosan's Nakadake Crater generated a whitish plume that rose 200 m above the crater. During fieldwork later that day, scientists confirmed that the event originated in the SW part of the crater and minor ashfall had occurred. A white plume rose 400 m on 7 September. The Alert Level remained at 2 (on a scale of 1-5).
Geologic Summary. The 24-km-wide Asosan caldera was formed during four major explosive eruptions from 300,000 to 90,000 years ago. These produced voluminous pyroclastic flows that covered much of Kyushu. The last of these, the Aso-4 eruption, produced more than 600 cu km of airfall tephra and pyroclastic-flow deposits. A group of 17 central cones was constructed in the middle of the caldera, one of which, Nakadake, is one of Japan's most active volcanoes. It was the location of Japan's first documented historical eruption in 553 AD. The Nakadake complex has remained active throughout the Holocene. Several other cones have been active during the Holocene, including the Kometsuka scoria cone as recently as about 210 CE. Historical eruptions have largely consisted of basaltic to basaltic-andesite ash emission with periodic strombolian and phreatomagmatic activity. The summit crater of Nakadake is accessible by toll road and cable car, and is one of Kyushu's most popular tourist destinations.
Source: Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA)
Cleveland  | Chuginadak Island (USA)  | 52.825°N, 169.944°W  | Summit elev. 1730 m
AVO reported that during 2-3 September a few very small earthquakes were detected at Cleveland. During 5-7 September elevated surface temperatures were detected in satellite images. Steaming from the summit was recorded by the webcam on 5 September. The next day satellite and webcam images showed a low-level gas-and-steam plume over the volcano. A robust steam plume was visible on 8 September. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange and the Volcano Alert Level remained at Watch.
Geologic Summary. Beautifully symmetrical Mount Cleveland stratovolcano is situated at the western end of the uninhabited, dumbbell-shaped Chuginadak Island. It lies SE across Carlisle Pass strait from Carlisle volcano and NE across Chuginadak Pass strait from Herbert volcano. Cleveland is joined to the rest of Chuginadak Island by a low isthmus. The 1730-m-high Mount Cleveland is the highest of the Islands of the Four Mountains group and is one of the most active of the Aleutian Islands. The native name for Mount Cleveland, Chuginadak, refers to the Aleut goddess of fire, who was thought to reside on the volcano. Numerous large lava flows descend the steep-sided flanks. It is possible that some 18th-to-19th century eruptions attributed to Carlisle should be ascribed to Cleveland (Miller et al., 1998). In 1944 Cleveland produced the only known fatality from an Aleutian eruption. Recent eruptions have been characterized by short-lived explosive ash emissions, at times accompanied by lava fountaining and lava flows down the flanks.
Source: US Geological Survey Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO)
Colima  | Mexico  | 19.514°N, 103.62°W  | Summit elev. 3850 m
Based on satellite images, the Washington VAAC reported that on 5 September a gas-and-ash plume from Colima rose to an altitude of 6.1 km (20,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 60 km NW.
Geologic Summary. The Colima volcanic complex is the most prominent volcanic center of the western Mexican Volcanic Belt. It consists of two southward-younging volcanoes, Nevado de Colima (the 4320 m high point of the complex) on the north and the 3850-m-high historically active Volcán de Colima at the south. A group of cinder cones of late-Pleistocene age is located on the floor of the Colima graben west and east of the Colima complex. Volcán de Colima (also known as Volcán Fuego) is a youthful stratovolcano constructed within a 5-km-wide caldera, breached to the south, that has been the source of large debris avalanches. Major slope failures have occurred repeatedly from both the Nevado and Colima cones, and have produced a thick apron of debris-avalanche deposits on three sides of the complex. Frequent historical eruptions date back to the 16th century. Occasional major explosive eruptions (most recently in 1913) have destroyed the summit and left a deep, steep-sided crater that was slowly refilled and then overtopped by lava dome growth.
Source: Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)
Dukono  | Halmahera (Indonesia)  | 1.68°N, 127.88°E  | Summit elev. 1335 m
Based on analyses of satellite imagery and wind data, the Darwin VAAC reported that during 2-7 September ash plumes from Dukono rose to an altitude of 2.1 km (7,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 35-165 km W, NW, N, NE, E, and SE.
Geologic Summary. Reports from this remote volcano in northernmost Halmahera are rare, but Dukono has been one of Indonesia's most active volcanoes. More-or-less continuous explosive eruptions, sometimes accompanied by lava flows, occurred from 1933 until at least the mid-1990s, when routine observations were curtailed. During a major eruption in 1550, a lava flow filled in the strait between Halmahera and the north-flank cone of Gunung Mamuya. This complex volcano presents a broad, low profile with multiple summit peaks and overlapping craters. Malupang Wariang, 1 km SW of the summit crater complex, contains a 700 x 570 m crater that has also been active during historical time.
Source: Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC)
Fuego  | Guatemala  | 14.473°N, 90.88°W  | Summit elev. 3763 m
INSIVUMEH reported that during 1-2 September activity at Fuego was characterized by lava fountains, explosions, and ashfall in surrounding areas. Pyroclastic flows descended the flanks. An ash plume rose 1.3 km above the crater and drifted 15 km W. Ashfall was reported in San Pedro Yepocapa (8 km N) and Chimaltenango (21 km NNE), and in the communities of Panimaché (8 km SW), Morelia (9 km SW), Santa Sofía (12 km SW), and Sangre de Cristo (8 km WSW). Activity decreased by the afternoon of 2 September; remnants of three lava flows were visible in the Santa Teresa (S), Trinidad (S) and Las Lajas (SE) drainages. Weak explosions during 4-5 September generated ash plumes that rose 450 m and drifted 7 km W and SE.
Geologic Summary. Volcán Fuego, one of Central America's most active volcanoes, is one of three large stratovolcanoes overlooking Guatemala's former capital, Antigua. The scarp of an older edifice, Meseta, lies between 3763-m-high Fuego and its twin volcano to the north, Acatenango. Construction of Meseta dates back to about 230,000 years and continued until the late Pleistocene or early Holocene. Collapse of Meseta may have produced the massive Escuintla debris-avalanche deposit, which extends about 50 km onto the Pacific coastal plain. Growth of the modern Fuego volcano followed, continuing the southward migration of volcanism that began at Acatenango. In contrast to the mostly andesitic Acatenango, eruptions at Fuego have become more mafic with time, and most historical activity has produced basaltic rocks. Frequent vigorous historical eruptions have been recorded since the onset of the Spanish era in 1524, and have produced major ashfalls, along with occasional pyroclastic flows and lava flows.
Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)
Gamalama  | Halmahera (Indonesia)  | 0.8°N, 127.33°E  | Summit elev. 1715 m
Based on satellite images, information from PVMBG, and wind data, the Darwin VAAC reported that on 8 September an ash plume from Gamalama rose to an altitude of 3 km (10,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted over 25 km NE.
Geologic Summary. Gamalama (Peak of Ternate) is a near-conical stratovolcano that comprises the entire island of Ternate off the western coast of Halmahera and is one of Indonesia's most active volcanoes. The island of Ternate was a major regional center in the Portuguese and Dutch spice trade for several centuries, which contributed to the thorough documentation of Gamalama's historical activity. Three cones, progressively younger to the north, form the summit of Gamalama, which reaches 1715 m. Several maars and vents define a rift zone, parallel to the Halmahera island arc, that cuts the volcano. Eruptions, recorded frequently since the 16th century, typically originated from the summit craters, although flank eruptions have occurred in 1763, 1770, 1775, and 1962-63.
Source: Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC)
Karymsky  | Eastern Kamchatka (Russia)  | 54.049°N, 159.443°E  | Summit elev. 1513 m
KVERT reported that moderate explosive activity at Karymsky continued during 28 August-4 September. Satellite images detected a thermal anomaly on the volcano on 2 September. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.
Geologic Summary. Karymsky, the most active volcano of Kamchatka's eastern volcanic zone, is a symmetrical stratovolcano constructed within a 5-km-wide caldera that formed during the early Holocene. The caldera cuts the south side of the Pleistocene Dvor volcano and is located outside the north margin of the large mid-Pleistocene Polovinka caldera, which contains the smaller Akademia Nauk and Odnoboky calderas. Most seismicity preceding Karymsky eruptions originated beneath Akademia Nauk caldera, located immediately south. The caldera enclosing Karymsky formed about 7600-7700 radiocarbon years ago; construction of the stratovolcano began about 2000 years later. The latest eruptive period began about 500 years ago, following a 2300-year quiescence. Much of the cone is mantled by lava flows less than 200 years old. Historical eruptions have been vulcanian or vulcanian-strombolian with moderate explosive activity and occasional lava flows from the summit crater.
Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)
Kilauea  | Hawaiian Islands (USA)  | 19.421°N, 155.287°W  | Summit elev. 1222 m
HVO reported that seismicity beneath Kilauea's summit, upper East Rift Zone, and Southwest Rift Zone was at background levels during 2-8 September. The lava lake continued to circulate and spatter in the Overlook vent. The June 27th NE-trending lava flow continued to be active within 4-8 km NE of Pu'u 'O'o Crater.
Geologic Summary. Kilauea volcano, which overlaps the east flank of the massive Mauna Loa shield volcano, has been Hawaii's most active volcano during historical time. Eruptions of Kilauea are prominent in Polynesian legends; written documentation extending back to only 1820 records frequent summit and flank lava flow eruptions that were interspersed with periods of long-term lava lake activity that lasted until 1924 at Halemaumau crater, within the summit caldera. The 3 x 5 km caldera was formed in several stages about 1500 years ago and during the 18th century; eruptions have also originated from the lengthy East and SW rift zones, which extend to the sea on both sides of the volcano. About 90% of the surface of the basaltic shield volcano is formed of lava flows less than about 1100 years old; 70% of the volcano's surface is younger than 600 years. A long-term eruption from the East rift zone that began in 1983 has produced lava flows covering more than 100 sq km, destroying nearly 200 houses and adding new coastline to the island.
Source: US Geological Survey Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO)
Manam  | Papua New Guinea  | 4.08°S, 145.037°E  | Summit elev. 1807 m
Based on observations of satellite imagery and wind data analyses, the Darwin VAAC reported that on 7 September ash plumes from Manam rose to an altitude of 2.1 km (7,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 75 km NW.
Geologic Summary. The 10-km-wide island of Manam, lying 13 km off the northern coast of mainland Papua New Guinea, is one of the country's most active volcanoes. Four large radial valleys extend from the unvegetated summit of the conical 1807-m-high basaltic-andesitic stratovolcano to its lower flanks. These "avalanche valleys" channel lava flows and pyroclastic avalanches that have sometimes reached the coast. Five small satellitic centers are located near the island's shoreline on the northern, southern, and western sides. Two summit craters are present; both are active, although most historical eruptions have originated from the southern crater, concentrating eruptive products during much of the past century into the SE valley. Frequent historical eruptions, typically of mild-to-moderate scale, have been recorded since 1616. Occasional larger eruptions have produced pyroclastic flows and lava flows that reached flat-lying coastal areas and entered the sea, sometimes impacting populated areas.
Source: Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC)
Santa Maria  | Guatemala  | 14.756°N, 91.552°W  | Summit elev. 3772 m
INSIVUMEH reported that on 5 September an explosion from Santa María's Santiaguito lava-dome complex generated an ash plume that rose 700 m and drifted SW. Ashfall was reported in Monte Claro (S). On 8 September heavy rainfall triggered a hot lahar that descended the Nimá I river drainage on the S flank. The lahar carried tree trunks, branches, and 1-m-wide blocks, had a strong sulfur odor, and was 20 m wide and 1.5 m deep.
Geologic Summary. Symmetrical, forest-covered Santa María volcano is one of the most prominent of a chain of large stratovolcanoes that rises dramatically above the Pacific coastal plain of Guatemala. The 3772-m-high stratovolcano has a sharp-topped, conical profile that is cut on the SW flank by a large, 1.5-km-wide crater. The oval-shaped crater extends from just below the summit to the lower flank and was formed during a catastrophic eruption in 1902. The renowned plinian eruption of 1902 that devastated much of SW Guatemala followed a long repose period after construction of the large basaltic-andesite stratovolcano. The massive dacitic Santiaguito lava-dome complex has been growing at the base of the 1902 crater since 1922. Compound dome growth at Santiaguito has occurred episodically from four westward-younging vents, the most recent of which is Caliente. Dome growth has been accompanied by almost continuous minor explosions, with periodic lava extrusion, larger explosions, pyroclastic flows, and lahars.
Source: Instituto Nacional de Sismologia, Vulcanologia, Meteorologia, e Hidrologia (INSIVUMEH)
Sheveluch  | Central Kamchatka (Russia)  | 56.653°N, 161.36°E  | Summit elev. 3283 m
KVERT reported that during 28 August-4 September lava-dome extrusion onto Sheveluch's N flank was accompanied by fumarolic activity, dome incandescence, and hot avalanches. Satellite images detected an almost daily thermal anomaly over the dome. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange.
Geologic Summary. The high, isolated massif of Sheveluch volcano (also spelled Shiveluch) rises above the lowlands NNE of the Kliuchevskaya volcano group. The 1300 cu km volcano is one of Kamchatka's largest and most active volcanic structures. The summit of roughly 65,000-year-old Stary Shiveluch is truncated by a broad 9-km-wide late-Pleistocene caldera breached to the south. Many lava domes dot its outer flanks. The Molodoy Shiveluch lava dome complex was constructed during the Holocene within the large horseshoe-shaped caldera; Holocene lava dome extrusion also took place on the flanks of Stary Shiveluch. At least 60 large eruptions have occurred during the Holocene, making it the most vigorous andesitic volcano of the Kuril-Kamchatka arc. Widespread tephra layers from these eruptions have provided valuable time markers for dating volcanic events in Kamchatka. Frequent collapses of dome complexes, most recently in 1964, have produced debris avalanches whose deposits cover much of the floor of the breached caldera.
Source: Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT)
Shishaldin  | Fox Islands (USA)  | 54.756°N, 163.97°W  | Summit elev. 2857 m
AVO reported that seismicity at Shishaldin continued to be elevated over background levels during 2-8 September, indicating that low-level eruptive activity confined to the summit crater continued. Cloud cover often prevented satellite and webcam observations; elevated surface temperatures were periodically detected in satellite images. The Aviation Color Code remained at Orange and the Volcano Alert Level remained at Watch.
Geologic Summary. The beautifully symmetrical volcano of Shishaldin is the highest and one of the most active volcanoes of the Aleutian Islands. The 2857-m-high, glacier-covered volcano is the westernmost of three large stratovolcanoes along an E-W line in the eastern half of Unimak Island. The Aleuts named the volcano Sisquk, meaning "mountain which points the way when I am lost." A steady steam plume rises from its small summit crater. Constructed atop an older glacially dissected volcano, it is Holocene in age and largely basaltic in composition. Remnants of an older ancestral volcano are exposed on the west and NE sides at 1500-1800 m elevation. There are over two dozen pyroclastic cones on its NW flank, which is blanketed by massive aa lava flows. Frequent explosive activity, primarily consisting of strombolian ash eruptions from the small summit crater, but sometimes producing lava flows, has been recorded since the 18th century.
Source: US Geological Survey Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO)
Sinabung  | Indonesia  | 3.17°N, 98.392°E  | Summit elev. 2460 m
Based on information from PVMBG, the Darwin VAAC reported that on 2 September an ash plume from Sinabung rose 2 km above the summit. On 3 September an ash plume rose to an altitude of 3 km (10,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted over 35 km W. The next day an ash plume rose to an altitude of 3.7 km (12,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 45 km W.
Geologic Summary. Gunung Sinabung is a Pleistocene-to-Holocene stratovolcano with many lava flows on its flanks. The migration of summit vents along a N-S line gives the summit crater complex an elongated form. The youngest crater of this conical, 2460-m-high andesitic-to-dacitic volcano is at the southern end of the four overlapping summit craters. An unconfirmed eruption was noted in 1881, and solfataric activity was seen at the summit and upper flanks in 1912. No confirmed historical eruptions were recorded prior to explosive eruptions during August-September 2010 that produced ash plumes to 5 km above the summit.
Source: Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC)
Tungurahua  | Ecuador  | 1.467°S, 78.442°W  | Summit elev. 5023 m
IG reported that on 1 September a lahar descended Tungurahua's flank, closing part of the Penipe-Riobamba road. On 2 September ash plumes rose 3 km and drifted W. The next day ashfall was reported in Quero (20 km NW), Santuario, El Rosario, La Galera, Choglontus (13 km WSW), El Manzano (8 km SW), and Pillate (8 km W).
Geologic Summary. Tungurahua, a steep-sided andesitic-dacitic stratovolcano that towers more than 3 km above its northern base, is one of Ecuador's most active volcanoes. Three major edifices have been sequentially constructed since the mid-Pleistocene over a basement of metamorphic rocks. Tungurahua II was built within the past 14,000 years following the collapse of the initial edifice. Tungurahua II itself collapsed about 3000 years ago and produced a large debris-avalanche deposit and a horseshoe-shaped caldera open to the west, inside which the modern glacier-capped stratovolcano (Tungurahua III) was constructed. Historical eruptions have all originated from the summit crater, accompanied by strong explosions and sometimes by pyroclastic flows and lava flows that reached populated areas at the volcano's base. Prior to a long-term eruption beginning in 1999 that caused the temporary evacuation of the city of Baños at the foot of the volcano, the last major eruption had occurred from 1916 to 1918, although minor activity continued until 1925.
Source: Instituto Geofísico-Escuela Politécnica Nacional (IG)
Ubinas  | Peru  | 16.355°S, 70.903°W  | Summit elev. 5672 m
Instituto Geofísico del Perú (IGP) Observatorio Volcanológico del Sur (OVS) reported increased seismicity at Ubinas during 1-7 September, specifically an increase in the occurrence of long-period events and hybrid signals. Tremor increased during 5-7 September. A steam plume rose 1.5 km above the base of the crater on 2 September, and ash emissions were recorded during 6-7 September.
Geologic Summary. A small, 1.4-km-wide caldera cuts the top of Ubinas, Peru's most active volcano, giving it a truncated appearance. It is the northernmost of three young volcanoes located along a regional structural lineament about 50 km behind the main volcanic front of Perú. The growth and destruction of Ubinas I was followed by construction of Ubinas II beginning in the mid-Pleistocene. The upper slopes of the andesitic-to-rhyolitic Ubinas II stratovolcano are composed primarily of andesitic and trachyandesitic lava flows and steepen to nearly 45 degrees. The steep-walled, 150-m-deep summit caldera contains an ash cone with a 500-m-wide funnel-shaped vent that is 200 m deep. Debris-avalanche deposits from the collapse of the SE flank about 3700 years ago extend 10 km from the volcano. Widespread plinian pumice-fall deposits include one of Holocene age about 1000 years ago. Holocene lava flows are visible on the flanks, but historical activity, documented since the 16th century, has consisted of intermittent minor-to-moderate explosive eruptions.
Source: Instituto Geofísico del Perú (IGP)


[ Volcano ]


No comments:

Post a Comment